Functional relevance of coronary artery disease by cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography: Myocardial perfusion and fractional flow reserve

Gianluca Pontone, Daniele Andreini, Andrea Baggiano, Erika Bertella, Saima Mushtaq, Edoardo Conte, Virginia Beltrama, Andrea Igoren Guaricci, Mauro Pepi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

Original languageEnglish
Article number297696
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Myocardial Fractional Flow Reserve
Magnetic resonance
Tomography
Coronary Artery Disease
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Perfusion
Angiography
Coronary Angiography
Anatomy
Imaging techniques
Myocardial Perfusion Imaging
Ionizing radiation
Ionizing Radiation
Coronary Vessels
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Functional relevance of coronary artery disease by cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography : Myocardial perfusion and fractional flow reserve. / Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Baggiano, Andrea; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Conte, Edoardo; Beltrama, Virginia; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2015, 297696, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0b9c50175d034b4a9abe199a3503f027,
title = "Functional relevance of coronary artery disease by cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography: Myocardial perfusion and fractional flow reserve",
abstract = "Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.",
author = "Gianluca Pontone and Daniele Andreini and Andrea Baggiano and Erika Bertella and Saima Mushtaq and Edoardo Conte and Virginia Beltrama and Guaricci, {Andrea Igoren} and Mauro Pepi",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1155/2015/297696",
language = "English",
volume = "2015",
journal = "BioMed Research International",
issn = "2314-6133",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional relevance of coronary artery disease by cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography

T2 - Myocardial perfusion and fractional flow reserve

AU - Pontone, Gianluca

AU - Andreini, Daniele

AU - Baggiano, Andrea

AU - Bertella, Erika

AU - Mushtaq, Saima

AU - Conte, Edoardo

AU - Beltrama, Virginia

AU - Guaricci, Andrea Igoren

AU - Pepi, Mauro

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

AB - Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84933056197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84933056197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2015/297696

DO - 10.1155/2015/297696

M3 - Article

C2 - 25692133

AN - SCOPUS:84933056197

VL - 2015

JO - BioMed Research International

JF - BioMed Research International

SN - 2314-6133

M1 - 297696

ER -