GABA transporters in the mammalian cerebral cortex: Localization, development and pathological implications

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extracellular levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cerebral cortex, are regulated by specific high-affinity, Na+/Cl- dependent transporters. Four distinct genes encoding GABA transporters (GATs), named GAT-1, GAT-2, GAT-3, and BGT-1 have been identified using molecular cloning. Of these, GAT-1 and -3 are expressed in the cerebral cortex. Studies of the cortical distribution, cellular localization, ontogeny and relationships of GATs with GABA-releasing elements using a variety of light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques have shown that: (i) a fraction of GATs is strategically placed to mediate GABA uptake at fast inhibitory synapses, terminating GABA's action and shaping inhibitory postsynaptic responses; (ii) another fraction may participate in functions such as the regulation of GABA's diffusion to neighboring synapses and of GABA levels in cerebrospinal fluid; (iii) GATs may play a role in the complex processes regulating cortical maturation; and (iv) GATs may contribute to the dysregulation of neuronal excitability that accompanies at least two major human diseases: epilepsy and ischemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-212
Number of pages17
JournalBrain Research Reviews
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

GABA Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Cerebral Cortex
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Synapses
Aminobutyrates
Molecular Cloning
Neurotransmitter Agents
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Epilepsy
Ischemia

Keywords

  • Amino acid neurotransmitters
  • D
  • GABA
  • Glia
  • Inhibitory synapses
  • Neurons
  • Neurotransmitter uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

GABA transporters in the mammalian cerebral cortex : Localization, development and pathological implications. / Conti, Fiorenzo; Minelli, Andrea; Melone, Marcello.

In: Brain Research Reviews, Vol. 45, No. 3, 07.2004, p. 196-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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