Gammadelta T lymphocytes producing IFNγ and IL-17 in response to Candida albicans or mycobacterial antigens

Possible implications for acute and chronic inflammation

A. Poggi, S. Catellani, A. Musso, M. R. Zocchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

T lymphocytes bearing the γδ T cell receptor are known to play an important role in the first-line defense against viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. Two main subsets of γδ T cells are known, showing distinct functional behavior: Vδ2 T lymphocytes, circulating in the peripheral blood, are involved in the response to mycobacterial infections and certain viruses, including coxsackie virus B3 and herpes simplex virus type 2. Vδ1 T cells are resident in the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue and are reported to participate in the immunity against Listeria monocytogenes and cytomegalovirus. Vδ2 T lymphocytes recognize non-peptidic phosphorylated metabolites of isoprenoid biosynthesis, expressed by mycobacteria, while Vδ1 T cells mainly interact with MHC-related antigens (MIC-A and MIC-B) and with receptors, called UL-16 binding proteins, for the UL-16 protein produced by cytomegalovirus-infected cells. Both Vδ1 and Vδ2 T cells can produce interferon-γ in response to MIC-A+ cells or non-peptide antigens, respectively. Moreover, production of TNF-α by human Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells has been demonstrated in response to bacterial products and non-peptidic molecules. Recently, it has been reported that γδ T lymphocytes can produce IL-17 during Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in mice. This is of interest as IL-17 is emerging as a cytokine crucial in the control of intracellular pathogens and fungi. In this review, we will discuss the possible role of IL-17 producing γδ T cells in the regulation of acute and chronic inflammation, focusing on the different responses of the two subsets to mycobacterial, viral or fungal antigens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4743-4749
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Medicinal Chemistry
Volume16
Issue number35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

T-cells
Interleukin-17
Candida
Candida albicans
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Viruses
Cytomegalovirus
Pathogens
Fungal Antigens
Bearings (structural)
Mycobacterium Infections
Listeria
Human Herpesvirus 2
Viral Antigens
Enterovirus
Terpenes
Listeria monocytogenes
T-Lymphocyte Subsets

Keywords

  • γδ T lymphocytes
  • CD161
  • Cytokines
  • Fungal infections
  • Phosphate antigens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

@article{2a0bfd8d6c7c48a9a7a8bc309d43b5d7,
title = "Gammadelta T lymphocytes producing IFNγ and IL-17 in response to Candida albicans or mycobacterial antigens: Possible implications for acute and chronic inflammation",
abstract = "T lymphocytes bearing the γδ T cell receptor are known to play an important role in the first-line defense against viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. Two main subsets of γδ T cells are known, showing distinct functional behavior: Vδ2 T lymphocytes, circulating in the peripheral blood, are involved in the response to mycobacterial infections and certain viruses, including coxsackie virus B3 and herpes simplex virus type 2. Vδ1 T cells are resident in the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue and are reported to participate in the immunity against Listeria monocytogenes and cytomegalovirus. Vδ2 T lymphocytes recognize non-peptidic phosphorylated metabolites of isoprenoid biosynthesis, expressed by mycobacteria, while Vδ1 T cells mainly interact with MHC-related antigens (MIC-A and MIC-B) and with receptors, called UL-16 binding proteins, for the UL-16 protein produced by cytomegalovirus-infected cells. Both Vδ1 and Vδ2 T cells can produce interferon-γ in response to MIC-A+ cells or non-peptide antigens, respectively. Moreover, production of TNF-α by human Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells has been demonstrated in response to bacterial products and non-peptidic molecules. Recently, it has been reported that γδ T lymphocytes can produce IL-17 during Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in mice. This is of interest as IL-17 is emerging as a cytokine crucial in the control of intracellular pathogens and fungi. In this review, we will discuss the possible role of IL-17 producing γδ T cells in the regulation of acute and chronic inflammation, focusing on the different responses of the two subsets to mycobacterial, viral or fungal antigens.",
keywords = "γδ T lymphocytes, CD161, Cytokines, Fungal infections, Phosphate antigens",
author = "A. Poggi and S. Catellani and A. Musso and Zocchi, {M. R.}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.2174/092986709789878238",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "4743--4749",
journal = "Current Medicinal Chemistry",
issn = "0929-8673",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers B.V.",
number = "35",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gammadelta T lymphocytes producing IFNγ and IL-17 in response to Candida albicans or mycobacterial antigens

T2 - Possible implications for acute and chronic inflammation

AU - Poggi, A.

AU - Catellani, S.

AU - Musso, A.

AU - Zocchi, M. R.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - T lymphocytes bearing the γδ T cell receptor are known to play an important role in the first-line defense against viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. Two main subsets of γδ T cells are known, showing distinct functional behavior: Vδ2 T lymphocytes, circulating in the peripheral blood, are involved in the response to mycobacterial infections and certain viruses, including coxsackie virus B3 and herpes simplex virus type 2. Vδ1 T cells are resident in the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue and are reported to participate in the immunity against Listeria monocytogenes and cytomegalovirus. Vδ2 T lymphocytes recognize non-peptidic phosphorylated metabolites of isoprenoid biosynthesis, expressed by mycobacteria, while Vδ1 T cells mainly interact with MHC-related antigens (MIC-A and MIC-B) and with receptors, called UL-16 binding proteins, for the UL-16 protein produced by cytomegalovirus-infected cells. Both Vδ1 and Vδ2 T cells can produce interferon-γ in response to MIC-A+ cells or non-peptide antigens, respectively. Moreover, production of TNF-α by human Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells has been demonstrated in response to bacterial products and non-peptidic molecules. Recently, it has been reported that γδ T lymphocytes can produce IL-17 during Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in mice. This is of interest as IL-17 is emerging as a cytokine crucial in the control of intracellular pathogens and fungi. In this review, we will discuss the possible role of IL-17 producing γδ T cells in the regulation of acute and chronic inflammation, focusing on the different responses of the two subsets to mycobacterial, viral or fungal antigens.

AB - T lymphocytes bearing the γδ T cell receptor are known to play an important role in the first-line defense against viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens. Two main subsets of γδ T cells are known, showing distinct functional behavior: Vδ2 T lymphocytes, circulating in the peripheral blood, are involved in the response to mycobacterial infections and certain viruses, including coxsackie virus B3 and herpes simplex virus type 2. Vδ1 T cells are resident in the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue and are reported to participate in the immunity against Listeria monocytogenes and cytomegalovirus. Vδ2 T lymphocytes recognize non-peptidic phosphorylated metabolites of isoprenoid biosynthesis, expressed by mycobacteria, while Vδ1 T cells mainly interact with MHC-related antigens (MIC-A and MIC-B) and with receptors, called UL-16 binding proteins, for the UL-16 protein produced by cytomegalovirus-infected cells. Both Vδ1 and Vδ2 T cells can produce interferon-γ in response to MIC-A+ cells or non-peptide antigens, respectively. Moreover, production of TNF-α by human Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells has been demonstrated in response to bacterial products and non-peptidic molecules. Recently, it has been reported that γδ T lymphocytes can produce IL-17 during Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in mice. This is of interest as IL-17 is emerging as a cytokine crucial in the control of intracellular pathogens and fungi. In this review, we will discuss the possible role of IL-17 producing γδ T cells in the regulation of acute and chronic inflammation, focusing on the different responses of the two subsets to mycobacterial, viral or fungal antigens.

KW - γδ T lymphocytes

KW - CD161

KW - Cytokines

KW - Fungal infections

KW - Phosphate antigens

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72449183735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72449183735&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2174/092986709789878238

DO - 10.2174/092986709789878238

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 4743

EP - 4749

JO - Current Medicinal Chemistry

JF - Current Medicinal Chemistry

SN - 0929-8673

IS - 35

ER -