Gastric cancer and allium vegetable intake: A critical review of the experimental and epidemiologic evidence

Valentina Guercio, Carlotta Galeone, Federica Turati, Carlo La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There are suggestions of an anticancerogenic effect of allium vegetables and their associated organosulfur components against several cancer types, including gastric cancer, but the issue remains open to discussion and quantification. The present critical review discussed the history, the health properties, the chemistry, the anticancerogenic evidences from experimental studies, and the anticancer mechanisms of allium vegetables. We also summarized findings from epidemiological studies concerning the association between different types of allium vegetables and gastric cancer risk, published up to date. Available data, derived mainly from case-control studies, suggested a favorable role of high intakes of allium vegetables, mainly garlic and onion, in the etiology of gastric cancer. In particular, of 10 studies, 7 suggested a favorable role of high intake of total allium vegetables and gastric cancer. All 14 studies on garlic and most studies on onion (more than 80%) reported a beneficial role of these allium types against gastric cancer. However several limitations, including possible publication bias and the difficulty to establish a dose-risk relationship, suggest caution in the interpretation. Evidences on other types of allium vegetables, as well as on the influence of different gastric cancer anatomical and histological types, are less consistent. © 2014

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-773
Number of pages17
JournalNutrition and Cancer
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 4 2014

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Allium
Vegetables
Stomach Neoplasms
Garlic
Onions
Publication Bias
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
History
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gastric cancer and allium vegetable intake : A critical review of the experimental and epidemiologic evidence. / Guercio, Valentina; Galeone, Carlotta; Turati, Federica; La Vecchia, Carlo.

In: Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 66, No. 5, 04.07.2014, p. 757-773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guercio, Valentina ; Galeone, Carlotta ; Turati, Federica ; La Vecchia, Carlo. / Gastric cancer and allium vegetable intake : A critical review of the experimental and epidemiologic evidence. In: Nutrition and Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 66, No. 5. pp. 757-773.
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