Gastric necrosis in newborns: A report of 11 cases

G. Pelizzo, R. Dubois, A. Lapillonne, X. Lainé, O. Claris, R. Bouvier, J. P. Chappuis

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Abstract

Eleven neonates ranging in gestational age from 34 to 40 weeks presented with gastric necrosis. The 4 full-term neonates showed sudden-onset hemorrage and 'coffee-ground' vomiting; in the 7 premature babies the initial clinical finding was abdominal distention. The criteria for diagnosis were: perinatal distress in prematures and transient neonatal respiratory distress in full-term babies. Radiographic evidence of gastric distention was typical and preceded clinical signs of hematemesis and gastric perforation. Surgery was performed in 8 patients; 3 received medical treatment. At surgery 1 total and 3 subtotal gastrectomies and 4 segmental gastric resections were performed. Three of these patients died post-operatively as a consequence of multiorgan failure; a second look was necessary in one patient 1 week after surgery because of prepyloric perforation due to ulcers. Biopsy specimens taken from the site of perforation demonstrated extensive necrosis; ulceration was disseminated in the surrounding gastric mucosa; no signs of phlogosis were detected. The diagnosis, treatment, and physiopathologic considerations are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-349
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume13
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1998

Fingerprint

Stomach
Necrosis
Newborn Infant
Hematemesis
Coffee
Gastrectomy
Gastric Mucosa
Gestational Age
Ulcer
Vomiting
Biopsy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Gastric infarction
  • Gastric necrosis
  • Neonatal gastric perforation
  • Peptic ulcer disease in children
  • Spontaneous gastric perforation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Pelizzo, G., Dubois, R., Lapillonne, A., Lainé, X., Claris, O., Bouvier, R., & Chappuis, J. P. (1998). Gastric necrosis in newborns: A report of 11 cases. Pediatric Surgery International, 13(5-6), 346-349. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003830050335

Gastric necrosis in newborns : A report of 11 cases. / Pelizzo, G.; Dubois, R.; Lapillonne, A.; Lainé, X.; Claris, O.; Bouvier, R.; Chappuis, J. P.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 13, No. 5-6, 07.1998, p. 346-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pelizzo, G, Dubois, R, Lapillonne, A, Lainé, X, Claris, O, Bouvier, R & Chappuis, JP 1998, 'Gastric necrosis in newborns: A report of 11 cases', Pediatric Surgery International, vol. 13, no. 5-6, pp. 346-349. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003830050335
Pelizzo G, Dubois R, Lapillonne A, Lainé X, Claris O, Bouvier R et al. Gastric necrosis in newborns: A report of 11 cases. Pediatric Surgery International. 1998 Jul;13(5-6):346-349. https://doi.org/10.1007/s003830050335
Pelizzo, G. ; Dubois, R. ; Lapillonne, A. ; Lainé, X. ; Claris, O. ; Bouvier, R. ; Chappuis, J. P. / Gastric necrosis in newborns : A report of 11 cases. In: Pediatric Surgery International. 1998 ; Vol. 13, No. 5-6. pp. 346-349.
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