'Gating' of human short-latency somatosensory evoked cortical responses during execution of movement. A high resolution electroencephalography study

Paolo M. Rossini, Claudio Babiloni, Fabio Babiloni, Anna Ambrosini, Paolo Onorati, Filippo Carducci, Antonio Urbano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study aimed at investigating gating of median nerve somatosensory evoked cortical responses (SECRs), estimated during executed continuous complex ipsilateral and contralateral sequential finger movements. SECRs were modeled with an advanced high resolution electroencephalography technology that dramatically improved spatial details of the scalp recorded somatosensory evoked potentials. Integration with magnetic resonance brain images allowed us to localize different SECRs within cortical areas. The working hypothesis was that the gating effects were time varying and could differently influence SECRs. Maximum statistically significant (p <0.01) time-varying gating (magnitude reduction) of the short-latency SECRs modeled in the contralateral primary motor and somatosensory and supplementary motor areas was computed during the executed ipsilateral movement. The gating effects were stronger on the modeled SECRs peaking 30-45 ms (N30-P30, N32, P45-N45) than 20-26 ms (P20-N20, P22, N26) post-stimulus. Furthermore, the modeled SECRs peaking 30 ms post-stimulus (N30-P30) were significantly increased in magnitude during the executed contralateral movement. These results may delineate a distributed cortical sensorimotor system responsible for the gating effects on SECRs. This system would be able to modulate activity of SECR generators, based on the integration of afferent somatosensory inputs from the stimulated nerve with outputs related to the movement execution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research
Volume843
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2 1999

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Median Nerve
Motor Cortex
Scalp
Fingers
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Technology
Brain

Keywords

  • Executed complex sequential finger movements
  • Gating effect
  • High resolution EEG
  • Somatosensory evoked cortical responses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

'Gating' of human short-latency somatosensory evoked cortical responses during execution of movement. A high resolution electroencephalography study. / Rossini, Paolo M.; Babiloni, Claudio; Babiloni, Fabio; Ambrosini, Anna; Onorati, Paolo; Carducci, Filippo; Urbano, Antonio.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 843, No. 1-2, 02.10.1999, p. 161-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rossini, Paolo M. ; Babiloni, Claudio ; Babiloni, Fabio ; Ambrosini, Anna ; Onorati, Paolo ; Carducci, Filippo ; Urbano, Antonio. / 'Gating' of human short-latency somatosensory evoked cortical responses during execution of movement. A high resolution electroencephalography study. In: Brain Research. 1999 ; Vol. 843, No. 1-2. pp. 161-170.
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