General intellectual impairment in chronic right hemisphere damaged patients with anosognosia: A group study

F. Mattioli, B. Gialanella, C. Stampatori, C. Scarpazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study evaluates the possible relations between cognitive impairment, persisting anosognosia for hemiplegia and peripersonal neglect. Thirty eight chronic right hemisphere stroke patients were divided in three age-and education-matched groups: A (n=13) patients with left hemiparesis, peripersonal neglect, and anosognosia for hemiplegia; B (n = 12) patients with left hemiparesis and peripersonal neglect, and C (n=13) patients with left hemiparesis only. We used MMSE and WAIS Verbal IQ and verbal subtests to assess cognitive impairment in patients, in order to avoid a bias due to visuospatial deficit, which is common in patients with neglect. VIQ, Information, Digit Span and Vocabulary WAIS subtests as well as MMSE were found to be significantly lower in group A versus group B. No difference was found in any test between groups B and C, indicating a general worse cognition in patients compared to those without anosognosia for hemiplegia. Patients with anosognosia for hemiplegia also showed larger brain lesions and, more frequently, frontal, parietal, temporal and basal ganglia involvement, particularly if they had low verbal IQ, indicating a relationship between cognitive impairment, persisting anosognosia for hemiplegia and large right hemisphere lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-515
Number of pages15
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2012

Keywords

  • Anosognosia
  • Intellectual impairment
  • Neglect
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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