I rapporti tra medico generico e radioterapista oncologo: Studio preliminare attraverso interviste telefoniche

Translated title of the contribution: General practitioner-radiotherapist relationship. A preliminary study by phone interviews

Ambrogia Baio, Dario Cavallini Francolini, Franco Corbella, Pietro De Vecchi, Livio Ragone, Carmine Tinelli, Pietro Franchini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose. We addressed the issue of the relationship between the general practitioner (GP) and the radiotherapist to improve the quality of care of cancer patients. Material and methods. The study consisted in evaluating medical requests and phone interviews, with a questionnaire with yes/no and multiple choice answers to the following 5 questions: 1) Do you think a cancer diagnosis is always a hopeless death sentence? 2) Is it professionally rewarding to cure a cancer patient? 3) Are you satisfied with your relationship, as a general practitioner, with oncologic reference centers? 4) Is it more wearing for a general practitioner to manage a cancer than a noncancer patient? 5) Would you answer a questionnaire about the relationship between the general practitioner, the cancer patient and the oncologist? We evaluated 1590 medical requests and made 401 phone interviews; 255 colleagues (70%) answered the questionnaire. Results. Medical requests were correctly and completely formulated by GPs in 45% of cases. A cancer diagnosis was not considered a hopeless death sentence in 90.9% of cases and 76% of GPs considered it professionally rewarding to cure a cancer patient. 75.6% of GPs considered it more wearing to manage a cancer than a non-cancer patient, and female GPs felt this more strongly than their male counterparts. Irrespective of gender, GPs over 50 years of age tend to consider cancer a hopeless and fatal disease. The relationship with oncologic centers was considered satisfactory in 86.2% of cases. However, since cancer patients need greater medical care, GPs would like a closer cooperation with oncologists. Discussion and conclusions. The great interest GPs took in this study encourages further investigation through a more in depth questionnaire designed with the help of GPs themselves and interested statisticians.

Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)396-400
Number of pages5
JournalRadiologia Medica
Volume98
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1999

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General Practitioners
Interviews
Neoplasms
Quality of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

I rapporti tra medico generico e radioterapista oncologo : Studio preliminare attraverso interviste telefoniche. / Baio, Ambrogia; Cavallini Francolini, Dario; Corbella, Franco; De Vecchi, Pietro; Ragone, Livio; Tinelli, Carmine; Franchini, Pietro.

In: Radiologia Medica, Vol. 98, No. 5, 11.1999, p. 396-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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