General versus spinal anesthesia with different forms of sedation in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy: Results of a prospective, randomized study

Andrea Salonia, Nazareno Suardi, Antonella Crescenti, Renzo Colombo, Patrizio Rigatti, Francesco Montorsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To assess the impact of spinal anesthesia (SpA) combined with three different forms of conscious sedation on intraoperative and postoperative outcome in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for organ confined prostate cancer (pCa). Methods: A total of 121 consecutive patients with pCa undergoing RRP were randomized into four groups. They were randomized as follows: group 1 (general anesthesia: 34 patients), group 2 (lumbar 2 to lumbar 3 interspace SpA with diazepam as sedative agent: 28), group 3 (SpA with propofol: 30), and group 4 (SpA with midazolam: 29). Intraoperative and perioperative parameters were collected. Results: The present study showed that muscle relaxation throughout RRP was not different in the four groups; bleeding was significantly (P = 0.04) lower with SpA, regardless of the form of sedation. Group 3 patients reported the best postoperative oxygen saturation percentage by pulse oximetry and sedation score (P = 0.02; d.f. = 3 and P <0.0001; d.f. = 3, respectively), the shortest waiting time in the postoperative holding area (P <0.001; d.f. = 3), the lowest pain on postoperative day 1 (P = 0.0004; d.f. = 3), and the highest frequency of first flatus passage (P = 0.0001; d.f. = 3). A higher number of group 4 patients were able to carry out unassisted ambulation (P <0.0001; d.f. = 3). Conclusions: Conscious sedation coupled with SpA is a safe, reliable and effective procedure for patients undergoing RRP. The use of propofol as sedative agent offers several advantages both over other types of conscious sedation and general anesthesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1190
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Urology
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Spinal Anesthesia
Prostatectomy
Prospective Studies
Conscious Sedation
Propofol
Hypnotics and Sedatives
General Anesthesia
Prostatic Neoplasms
Flatulence
Muscle Relaxation
Oximetry
Midazolam
Diazepam
Postoperative Pain
Walking
Hemorrhage
Oxygen

Keywords

  • General anesthesia
  • Prostate cancer
  • Radical prostatectomy
  • Sedation
  • Spinal anesthesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

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title = "General versus spinal anesthesia with different forms of sedation in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy: Results of a prospective, randomized study",
abstract = "Aim: To assess the impact of spinal anesthesia (SpA) combined with three different forms of conscious sedation on intraoperative and postoperative outcome in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for organ confined prostate cancer (pCa). Methods: A total of 121 consecutive patients with pCa undergoing RRP were randomized into four groups. They were randomized as follows: group 1 (general anesthesia: 34 patients), group 2 (lumbar 2 to lumbar 3 interspace SpA with diazepam as sedative agent: 28), group 3 (SpA with propofol: 30), and group 4 (SpA with midazolam: 29). Intraoperative and perioperative parameters were collected. Results: The present study showed that muscle relaxation throughout RRP was not different in the four groups; bleeding was significantly (P = 0.04) lower with SpA, regardless of the form of sedation. Group 3 patients reported the best postoperative oxygen saturation percentage by pulse oximetry and sedation score (P = 0.02; d.f. = 3 and P <0.0001; d.f. = 3, respectively), the shortest waiting time in the postoperative holding area (P <0.001; d.f. = 3), the lowest pain on postoperative day 1 (P = 0.0004; d.f. = 3), and the highest frequency of first flatus passage (P = 0.0001; d.f. = 3). A higher number of group 4 patients were able to carry out unassisted ambulation (P <0.0001; d.f. = 3). Conclusions: Conscious sedation coupled with SpA is a safe, reliable and effective procedure for patients undergoing RRP. The use of propofol as sedative agent offers several advantages both over other types of conscious sedation and general anesthesia.",
keywords = "General anesthesia, Prostate cancer, Radical prostatectomy, Sedation, Spinal anesthesia",
author = "Andrea Salonia and Nazareno Suardi and Antonella Crescenti and Renzo Colombo and Patrizio Rigatti and Francesco Montorsi",
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T1 - General versus spinal anesthesia with different forms of sedation in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy

T2 - Results of a prospective, randomized study

AU - Salonia, Andrea

AU - Suardi, Nazareno

AU - Crescenti, Antonella

AU - Colombo, Renzo

AU - Rigatti, Patrizio

AU - Montorsi, Francesco

PY - 2006/9

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N2 - Aim: To assess the impact of spinal anesthesia (SpA) combined with three different forms of conscious sedation on intraoperative and postoperative outcome in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for organ confined prostate cancer (pCa). Methods: A total of 121 consecutive patients with pCa undergoing RRP were randomized into four groups. They were randomized as follows: group 1 (general anesthesia: 34 patients), group 2 (lumbar 2 to lumbar 3 interspace SpA with diazepam as sedative agent: 28), group 3 (SpA with propofol: 30), and group 4 (SpA with midazolam: 29). Intraoperative and perioperative parameters were collected. Results: The present study showed that muscle relaxation throughout RRP was not different in the four groups; bleeding was significantly (P = 0.04) lower with SpA, regardless of the form of sedation. Group 3 patients reported the best postoperative oxygen saturation percentage by pulse oximetry and sedation score (P = 0.02; d.f. = 3 and P <0.0001; d.f. = 3, respectively), the shortest waiting time in the postoperative holding area (P <0.001; d.f. = 3), the lowest pain on postoperative day 1 (P = 0.0004; d.f. = 3), and the highest frequency of first flatus passage (P = 0.0001; d.f. = 3). A higher number of group 4 patients were able to carry out unassisted ambulation (P <0.0001; d.f. = 3). Conclusions: Conscious sedation coupled with SpA is a safe, reliable and effective procedure for patients undergoing RRP. The use of propofol as sedative agent offers several advantages both over other types of conscious sedation and general anesthesia.

AB - Aim: To assess the impact of spinal anesthesia (SpA) combined with three different forms of conscious sedation on intraoperative and postoperative outcome in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) for organ confined prostate cancer (pCa). Methods: A total of 121 consecutive patients with pCa undergoing RRP were randomized into four groups. They were randomized as follows: group 1 (general anesthesia: 34 patients), group 2 (lumbar 2 to lumbar 3 interspace SpA with diazepam as sedative agent: 28), group 3 (SpA with propofol: 30), and group 4 (SpA with midazolam: 29). Intraoperative and perioperative parameters were collected. Results: The present study showed that muscle relaxation throughout RRP was not different in the four groups; bleeding was significantly (P = 0.04) lower with SpA, regardless of the form of sedation. Group 3 patients reported the best postoperative oxygen saturation percentage by pulse oximetry and sedation score (P = 0.02; d.f. = 3 and P <0.0001; d.f. = 3, respectively), the shortest waiting time in the postoperative holding area (P <0.001; d.f. = 3), the lowest pain on postoperative day 1 (P = 0.0004; d.f. = 3), and the highest frequency of first flatus passage (P = 0.0001; d.f. = 3). A higher number of group 4 patients were able to carry out unassisted ambulation (P <0.0001; d.f. = 3). Conclusions: Conscious sedation coupled with SpA is a safe, reliable and effective procedure for patients undergoing RRP. The use of propofol as sedative agent offers several advantages both over other types of conscious sedation and general anesthesia.

KW - General anesthesia

KW - Prostate cancer

KW - Radical prostatectomy

KW - Sedation

KW - Spinal anesthesia

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