Genetic prediction of common diseases: Still no help for the clinical diabetologist!

S. Prudente, B. Dallapiccola, F. Pellegrini, A. Doria, V. Trischitta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with many common, multifactorial diseases which have been recently used to market genetic testing directly to the consumers. We here addressed the clinical utility of such GWAS-derived genetic information in predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients. In addition, the development of new statistical approaches, novel technologies of genome sequencing and ethical, legal and social aspects related to genetic testing have been also addressed. Available data clearly show that, similarly to what reported for most common diseases, genetic testing offered today by commercial companies cannot be used as predicting tools for T2DM and CAD. Further studies taking into account the complex interaction between genes as well as between genetic and non-genetic factors, including age, obesity and glycemic control which seem to modify genetic effects on the risk of T2DM and CAD, might mitigate such negative conclusions. Also, addressing the role of relatively rare variants by next generation sequencing may help identify novel and strong genetic markers with an important role in genetic prediction. Finally, statistical tools concentrated on reclassifying patients might be a useful application of genetic information for predicting many common diseases. By now, prediction of such diseases, including those of interest for the clinical diabetologist, have to be pursued by using traditional clinical markers which perform well and are not costly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)929-936
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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Keywords

  • Common multifactorial diseases
  • Direct-to consumer testing
  • Diseases prediction models
  • Ethical, legal and social issues
  • Genetic counseling
  • Genome-wide association studies
  • Next generation sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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