Genetic progression of metastatic melanoma

Monica Rodolfo, Maria Daniotti, Viviana Vallacchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Melanoma progression is well defined in its clinical, histopathological and biological aspects, but the molecular mechanism involved and the genetic markers associated to metastatic dissemination are only beginning to be defined. The recent development of high-throughput technologies aimed at global molecular profiling of cancer is switching on the spotlight at previously unknown candidate genes involved in melanoma, such as WNT5A and BRAF. In fact, several tumor suppressors and oncogenes have been shown to be involved in melanoma pathogenesis, including CDKN2A, PTEN, TP53, RAS and MYC, though they have not been related to melanoma subtypes or validated as prognostic markers. Here, we have reviewed the published data relative to the major genes involved in melanoma pathogenesis, which may represent important markers for the identification of genetic profiles of melanoma subtypes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-147
Number of pages15
JournalCancer Letters
Volume214
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 28 2004

Fingerprint

Melanoma
Genetic Markers
Oncogenes
Genes
Neoplasms
Technology

Keywords

  • BRAF
  • CDKN2A
  • Melanoma
  • Progression
  • PTEN
  • RAS
  • TP53

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Biology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Genetic progression of metastatic melanoma. / Rodolfo, Monica; Daniotti, Maria; Vallacchi, Viviana.

In: Cancer Letters, Vol. 214, No. 2, 28.10.2004, p. 133-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodolfo, Monica ; Daniotti, Maria ; Vallacchi, Viviana. / Genetic progression of metastatic melanoma. In: Cancer Letters. 2004 ; Vol. 214, No. 2. pp. 133-147.
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