Glomerular endothelial cells versus podocytes as the cellular target in diabetic nephropathy

S Maestroni, G Zerbini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It usually takes several years (in some cases, decades) for predisposed individuals to move from the onset of type 1 or type 2 diabetes to the development of microalbuminuria, the first sign of diabetic nephropathy. This long, complication-free, period represents the best possible moment to start a successful preventive strategy (primary prevention) aimed to avoid or at least to postpone the increase of albumin excretion rate. Prevention is based on understanding and counteracting the initial mechanisms leading to the development of the disease and unfortunately, in case of diabetic nephropathy, most of them remain unclear. Little is also known about which, among endothelial cells and podocytes, represent the first glomerular target of the complication. Selective damage of the endothelium or of the podocyte results, as a common consequence, in an increase of albumin excretion rate. Albuminuria by itself cannot therefore be of help to solve the case. Endothelium and podocytes are involved in a continuous cross-talk and by studying the impact of diabetes on this “communication” process it should be possible to obtain some information regarding the weak component of the glomerular filter. Finally, the careful investigation of the mechanisms leading to the development podocyturia, a recently identified glomerular dysfunction associated to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, could contribute to shed some more light on the very early stages of this complication. © 2018, Springer-Verlag Italia S.r.l., part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1105-1111
Number of pages7
JournalActa Diabetologica
Volume55
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Podocytes
Diabetic Nephropathies
Endothelial Cells
Endothelium
Albumins
Albuminuria
Primary Prevention
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
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Glomerular endothelial cells versus podocytes as the cellular target in diabetic nephropathy. / Maestroni, S; Zerbini, G.

In: Acta Diabetologica, Vol. 55, No. 11, 2018, p. 1105-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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