Glutamine addiction of cancer cells

Enrico Desideri, Maria Rosa Ciriolo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer cells show an altered metabolism to fulfill their energy requirements. Along with the higher aerobic glycolytic flux, some tumors show a higher demand of glutamine with respect to normal cells. Indeed, glutamine sustains tumor proliferation rate being both a carbon and nitrogen donor for biosynthetic pathways. Glutamine also play other essential roles: mediates the uptake of non-essential aminoacids, preserves mitochondrial homeostasis and it is required for cell cycle progression. This glutamine addiction of cancer cells can be exploited to develop new anticancer therapies that target different steps of glutamine metabolism (e.g. uptake, catabolism). Many lines of evidence demonstrated that many cancer cell lines are sensitive to glutamine deprivation. In particular, glutamine deprivation has been observed to induce myc-dependent apoptosis in cell overexpressing the oncogene myc. Moreover, it has been recently demonstrated by our group that glutamine deprivation led to the upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), which is the main responsible for the uptake of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), an anti tumor agent under clinical development. MCT1 upregulation results in a higher sensitivity of cancer cells to 3-BrPA both in vivo and in vitro, providing a promising strategy for the treatment of glycolytic tumours.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlutamine in Clinical Nutrition
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages99-111
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781493919321, 9781493919314
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Glutamine
glutamine
Cells
Tumors
Neoplasms
Metabolism
neoplasms
uptake mechanisms
metabolism
transporters
Cell death
Up-Regulation
myc Genes
neoplasm cells
oncogenes
Biosynthetic Pathways
Fluxes
Nitrogen
energy requirements
Carbon

Keywords

  • 3-Bromopyruvic acid
  • Cancer
  • Chemopotentiation
  • Chemotherapy
  • Glutaminase
  • Glutamine
  • Metabolism
  • Oncogene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Desideri, E., & Ciriolo, M. R. (2015). Glutamine addiction of cancer cells. In Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition (pp. 99-111). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_8

Glutamine addiction of cancer cells. / Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa.

Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, 2015. p. 99-111.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Desideri, E & Ciriolo, MR 2015, Glutamine addiction of cancer cells. in Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, pp. 99-111. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_8
Desideri E, Ciriolo MR. Glutamine addiction of cancer cells. In Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York. 2015. p. 99-111 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1932-1_8
Desideri, Enrico ; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa. / Glutamine addiction of cancer cells. Glutamine in Clinical Nutrition. Springer New York, 2015. pp. 99-111
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