Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease

G. R. Corazza, P. Sarchielli, M. Londei, M. Frisoni, G. Gasbarrini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A T lymphocyte direct migration inhibition factor test has been used to investigate the function of the specific suppressor T cell population controlling the immune response to gluten in coeliac disease. The test has been carried out in 21 adult coeliac patients, 22 Mantoux- healthy controls and eight Mantoux+ donors using gluten fraction III and purified protein derivative, as antigens. All coeliacs, but two, were Mantoux-. When gluten fraction III was used a significant migration inhibition was observed in coeliac patients compared to controls; such migration inhibition was abrogated by coculturing in a 1:1 ratio coeliac T cells with T cells from controls or Mantoux+ donors. On the contrary, the addition to coeliac T cells of T lymphocytes from other coeliacs did not abolish migration inhibition to gluten. Pretreatment of normal T cells with mitomycin C prevented their abrogating activity on migration inhibition of coeliac T lymphocytes. When purified protein derivative was used as antigen a significant migration inhibition was observed in Mantoux+ donors compared with healthy subjects and such migration inhibition was abolished by co-culturing T cells from Mantoux+ donors with those from Mantoux- controls and coeliac patients. Our results show that coeliac T cells, while retaining their ability to suppress the immune response to purified protein derivative, cannot suppress the immune response to gluten and are consistent with the hypothesis that a gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction, rather than a generalised T lymphocyte defect, may play a role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-398
Number of pages7
JournalGut
Volume27
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1986

Fingerprint

Glutens
Celiac Disease
Abdomen
T-Lymphocytes
Tissue Donors
Antigens
Proteins
Mitomycin
Healthy Volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Corazza, G. R., Sarchielli, P., Londei, M., Frisoni, M., & Gasbarrini, G. (1986). Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease. Gut, 27(4), 392-398.

Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease. / Corazza, G. R.; Sarchielli, P.; Londei, M.; Frisoni, M.; Gasbarrini, G.

In: Gut, Vol. 27, No. 4, 04.1986, p. 392-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corazza, GR, Sarchielli, P, Londei, M, Frisoni, M & Gasbarrini, G 1986, 'Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease', Gut, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 392-398.
Corazza GR, Sarchielli P, Londei M, Frisoni M, Gasbarrini G. Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease. Gut. 1986 Apr;27(4):392-398.
Corazza, G. R. ; Sarchielli, P. ; Londei, M. ; Frisoni, M. ; Gasbarrini, G. / Gluten specific suppressor T cell dysfunction in coeliac disease. In: Gut. 1986 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 392-398.
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