Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein

Elide A. Pastorello, Valerio Pravettoni, Laura Farioli, Laura Primavesi, Joseph Scibilia, Marta Piantanida, Ambra Mascheri, Amedeo Conti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green beans belong to the Fabaceae family, which includes widely consumed species, such as beans, peanuts, and soybeans. In the literature, few cases have described allergic reactions upon the exposure to green bean boiling steam or ingestion. Here, we describe five patients reporting documented adverse reactions upon the ingestion of cooked green beans, and we characterize the responsible allergen. Fresh and cooked green beans were tested by a prick + prick technique. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and IgE immunoblotting were performed with boiled vegetable extract, and the N-terminal sequence of the immunoreactive protein was obtained by analyzing the excised band in a protein sequencer. Immunoblotting inhibition of cooked green bean with in-house-purified peach lipid transfer protein (LTP) Pru p 3 was performed. An interesting green bean protein was chromatographically purified, tested with a pool serum, and inhibited with Pru p 3. Moreover, its molecular mass was determined by mass spectrometry. Prick + prick tests with raw and cooked green beans were positive for all of the patients. IgE immunoblotting showed that all of the patients reacted toward a unique IgE-binding protein at about 9 kDa. The obtained N-terminal sequence revealed the following amino acids: Ala-Ile-Ser-X-Gly-Qln-Val-Thr-Ser-Ser-Leu-Ala, corresponding to an LTP. A complete inhibition of the IgE binding to this protein, in both raw and purified extract, was obtained by purified peach Pru p 3, confirming previous IgE immunoblotting results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4513-4516
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 14 2010

Fingerprint

Phaseolus
green beans
Immunoblotting
Immunoglobulin E
Phaseolus vulgaris
binding proteins
Galectin 3
immunoblotting
Proteins
Eating
Steam
Vegetables
Molecular mass
peaches
Electrophoresis
Soybeans
Fabaceae
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Allergens
Boiling liquids

Keywords

  • Food allergy
  • Green bean allergy
  • Legume allergy
  • Lipid transfer protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) : A new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein. / Pastorello, Elide A.; Pravettoni, Valerio; Farioli, Laura; Primavesi, Laura; Scibilia, Joseph; Piantanida, Marta; Mascheri, Ambra; Conti, Amedeo.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 58, No. 7, 14.04.2010, p. 4513-4516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pastorello, Elide A. ; Pravettoni, Valerio ; Farioli, Laura ; Primavesi, Laura ; Scibilia, Joseph ; Piantanida, Marta ; Mascheri, Ambra ; Conti, Amedeo. / Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) : A new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein. In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 58, No. 7. pp. 4513-4516.
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