Gut microbiota and physical frailty through the mediation of sarcopenia

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Abstract

The changing physiology and lifestyle of older people affect the gut microbiota composition. In particular, the age-related diet modifications can alter the gut microbiota biodiversity and determine the relative abundance of specific microbial taxa, resulting in microbiota dysbiosis with negative consequences for the host physiology. Unhealthy microbiota may then induce an acceleration of the age-related physiological changes, consequently concurring at determining the characteristic complexity of frail older persons. One of the major clinical manifestations of frailty is represented by the individual's physical decline. Besides of a well-established clinical phenotype of frailty, the qualitative and quantitative skeletal muscle impairment (i.e., sarcopenia) is today of particular interest for potentially serving as target for (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) interventions to prevent incident disability. Evidence suggests that gut microbiota is able to influence the skeletal muscle homeostasis via microbiota-dependent metabolites, thus representing the possible biological substratum for the sarcopenia onset. In fact, the rearrangements of gut microbiota as well as the alteration of its functions contribute at increasing the anabolic resistance, releasing pro-inflammatory mediators, determining mitochondrial abnormalities with consequent oxidation, and causing insulin resistance. In this article, the link between gut microbiota and physical frailty is discussed. It is especially explained the role that sarcopenia may play in this likely bidirectional relationship.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110639
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume124
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Sarcopenia
Physiology
Muscle
Microbiota
Biodiversity
Nutrition
Metabolites
Insulin
Skeletal Muscle
Oxidation
Dysbiosis
Diet Therapy
Chemical analysis
Insulin Resistance
Life Style
Homeostasis
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Pharmacology
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Gut microbiota
  • Physical frailty
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Ageing
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Gut microbiota and physical frailty through the mediation of sarcopenia",
abstract = "The changing physiology and lifestyle of older people affect the gut microbiota composition. In particular, the age-related diet modifications can alter the gut microbiota biodiversity and determine the relative abundance of specific microbial taxa, resulting in microbiota dysbiosis with negative consequences for the host physiology. Unhealthy microbiota may then induce an acceleration of the age-related physiological changes, consequently concurring at determining the characteristic complexity of frail older persons. One of the major clinical manifestations of frailty is represented by the individual's physical decline. Besides of a well-established clinical phenotype of frailty, the qualitative and quantitative skeletal muscle impairment (i.e., sarcopenia) is today of particular interest for potentially serving as target for (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) interventions to prevent incident disability. Evidence suggests that gut microbiota is able to influence the skeletal muscle homeostasis via microbiota-dependent metabolites, thus representing the possible biological substratum for the sarcopenia onset. In fact, the rearrangements of gut microbiota as well as the alteration of its functions contribute at increasing the anabolic resistance, releasing pro-inflammatory mediators, determining mitochondrial abnormalities with consequent oxidation, and causing insulin resistance. In this article, the link between gut microbiota and physical frailty is discussed. It is especially explained the role that sarcopenia may play in this likely bidirectional relationship.",
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AU - Arosio, Beatrice

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