Gut Microbiota Modulation for Multidrug-Resistant Organism Decolonization: Present and Future Perspectives

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is of great concern to global public health. Treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections is a major clinical challenge: the increase in antibiotic resistance leads to a greater risk of therapeutic failure, relapses, longer hospitalizations, and worse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are no validated treatments for many MDR or pandrug-resistant (PDR) infections, and preventing the spread of these pathogens through hospital infection control procedures and antimicrobial stewardship programs is often the only tool available to healthcare providers. Therefore, new solutions to control the colonization of MDR pathogens are urgently needed. In this narrative review, we discuss current knowledge of microbiota-mediated mechanisms of AMR and strategies for MDR colonization control. We focus particularly on fecal microbiota transplantation for MDR intestinal decolonization and report updated literature on its current clinical use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1704
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Pharmaceutical Preparations
Microbiota
Multiple Drug Resistance
Infection Control
Microbial Drug Resistance
Cross Infection
Infection
Health Personnel
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Public Health
Recurrence
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Global Health
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation

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@article{35f87223149649c38137b36b6114d24a,
title = "Gut Microbiota Modulation for Multidrug-Resistant Organism Decolonization: Present and Future Perspectives",
abstract = "The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is of great concern to global public health. Treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections is a major clinical challenge: the increase in antibiotic resistance leads to a greater risk of therapeutic failure, relapses, longer hospitalizations, and worse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are no validated treatments for many MDR or pandrug-resistant (PDR) infections, and preventing the spread of these pathogens through hospital infection control procedures and antimicrobial stewardship programs is often the only tool available to healthcare providers. Therefore, new solutions to control the colonization of MDR pathogens are urgently needed. In this narrative review, we discuss current knowledge of microbiota-mediated mechanisms of AMR and strategies for MDR colonization control. We focus particularly on fecal microbiota transplantation for MDR intestinal decolonization and report updated literature on its current clinical use.",
author = "Livia Gargiullo and {Del Chierico}, Federica and Patrizia D'Argenio and Lorenza Putignani",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2019.01704",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "1704",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S. A.",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Gut Microbiota Modulation for Multidrug-Resistant Organism Decolonization

T2 - Present and Future Perspectives

AU - Gargiullo, Livia

AU - Del Chierico, Federica

AU - D'Argenio, Patrizia

AU - Putignani, Lorenza

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is of great concern to global public health. Treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections is a major clinical challenge: the increase in antibiotic resistance leads to a greater risk of therapeutic failure, relapses, longer hospitalizations, and worse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are no validated treatments for many MDR or pandrug-resistant (PDR) infections, and preventing the spread of these pathogens through hospital infection control procedures and antimicrobial stewardship programs is often the only tool available to healthcare providers. Therefore, new solutions to control the colonization of MDR pathogens are urgently needed. In this narrative review, we discuss current knowledge of microbiota-mediated mechanisms of AMR and strategies for MDR colonization control. We focus particularly on fecal microbiota transplantation for MDR intestinal decolonization and report updated literature on its current clinical use.

AB - The emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is of great concern to global public health. Treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections is a major clinical challenge: the increase in antibiotic resistance leads to a greater risk of therapeutic failure, relapses, longer hospitalizations, and worse clinical outcomes. Currently, there are no validated treatments for many MDR or pandrug-resistant (PDR) infections, and preventing the spread of these pathogens through hospital infection control procedures and antimicrobial stewardship programs is often the only tool available to healthcare providers. Therefore, new solutions to control the colonization of MDR pathogens are urgently needed. In this narrative review, we discuss current knowledge of microbiota-mediated mechanisms of AMR and strategies for MDR colonization control. We focus particularly on fecal microbiota transplantation for MDR intestinal decolonization and report updated literature on its current clinical use.

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01704

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01704

M3 - Review article

C2 - 31402904

VL - 10

SP - 1704

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

ER -