Hand-in-hand advances in biomedical engineering and sensorimotor restoration

Iolanda Pisotta, David Perruchoud, Silvio Ionta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Living in a multisensory world entails the continuous sensory processing of environmental information in order to enact appropriate motor routines. The interaction between our body and our brain is the crucial factor for achieving such sensorimotor integration ability. Several clinical conditions dramatically affect the constant body-brain exchange, but the latest developments in biomedical engineering provide promising solutions for overcoming this communication breakdown. New method: The ultimate technological developments succeeded in transforming neuronal electrical activity into computational input for robotic devices, giving birth to the era of the so-called brain-machine interfaces. Combining rehabilitation robotics and experimental neuroscience the rise of brain-machine interfaces into clinical protocols provided the technological solution for bypassing the neural disconnection and restore sensorimotor function. Results: Based on these advances, the recovery of sensorimotor functionality is progressively becoming a concrete reality. However, despite the success of several recent techniques, some open issues still need to be addressed. Comparison with existing method(s): Typical interventions for sensorimotor deficits include pharmaceutical treatments and manual/robotic assistance in passive movements. These procedures achieve symptoms relief but their applicability to more severe disconnection pathologies is limited (e.g. spinal cord injury or amputation). Conclusions: Here we review how state-of-the-art solutions in biomedical engineering are continuously increasing expectances in sensorimotor rehabilitation, as well as the current challenges especially with regards to the translation of the signals from brain-machine interfaces into sensory feedback and the incorporation of brain-machine interfaces into daily activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume246
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 5 2015

Fingerprint

Biomedical Engineering
Brain-Computer Interfaces
Robotics
Rehabilitation
Sensory Feedback
Aptitude
Brain
Neurosciences
Clinical Protocols
Spinal Cord Injuries
Automatic Data Processing
Amputation
Parturition
Pathology
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Biomedical engineering
  • Brain
  • Motor
  • Peripheral nervous system
  • Rehabilitation
  • Sensory
  • Spinal cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hand-in-hand advances in biomedical engineering and sensorimotor restoration. / Pisotta, Iolanda; Perruchoud, David; Ionta, Silvio.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 246, 05.05.2015, p. 22-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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