Has Blood Glucose Level Measured on Admission to Hospital in a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis Any Prognostic Value?

Paul Georg Lankisch, Torsten Blum, Anja Bruns, Michael Dröge, Gisbert Brinkmann, Karl Struckmann, Michael Nauck, Patrick Maisonneuve, Albert B. Lowenfels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Early detection of pancreatic necrosis allows better management of the disease. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard for detecting pancreatic necrosis is expensive. Aim of the Study: This study was to evaluate for the first time whether blood glucose estimation on hospital admission - a simple, cheap, readily available laboratory parameter - may detect pancreatic necrosis and have prognostic value in acute pancreatitis. Methods: Single blood glucose estimation upon hospital admission was evaluated prospectively for detecting pancreatic necrosis and as a prognostic indicator. The study included 241 nondiabetic patients with a first attack of acute pancreatitis. All underwent CT within 72 h of admission. Results: High blood glucose (>125 mg/dl) correlated significantly with complex high clinical and biochemical prognostic scores (Ranson, Imrie), a high Balthazar score, pancreatic pseudocysts, and a long hospital stay, but not with organ failure, indication for artificial ventilation, dialysis, surgery, length of intensive care, and mortality. Pancreatic necrosis detection sensitivity of high blood glucose was 83%, specificity 49%, positive predictive value 28%, and negative predictive value 92%. Conclusion: A patient with normal blood glucose on admission is unlikely to have pancreatic necrosis. Contrast-enhanced CT would not be needed unless the patient fails to improve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-229
Number of pages6
JournalPancreatology
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Pancreatitis
Blood Glucose
Necrosis
Tomography
Pancreatic Pseudocyst
Critical Care
Disease Management
Dialysis
Length of Stay
Mortality

Keywords

  • Acute pancreatitis
  • Blood glucose
  • Computed tomography
  • Pancreatic necrosis
  • Prognosis
  • Prognostic parameters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Lankisch, P. G., Blum, T., Bruns, A., Dröge, M., Brinkmann, G., Struckmann, K., ... Lowenfels, A. B. (2001). Has Blood Glucose Level Measured on Admission to Hospital in a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis Any Prognostic Value? Pancreatology, 1(3), 224-229. https://doi.org/10.1159/000055815

Has Blood Glucose Level Measured on Admission to Hospital in a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis Any Prognostic Value? / Lankisch, Paul Georg; Blum, Torsten; Bruns, Anja; Dröge, Michael; Brinkmann, Gisbert; Struckmann, Karl; Nauck, Michael; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B.

In: Pancreatology, Vol. 1, No. 3, 2001, p. 224-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lankisch, PG, Blum, T, Bruns, A, Dröge, M, Brinkmann, G, Struckmann, K, Nauck, M, Maisonneuve, P & Lowenfels, AB 2001, 'Has Blood Glucose Level Measured on Admission to Hospital in a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis Any Prognostic Value?', Pancreatology, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 224-229. https://doi.org/10.1159/000055815
Lankisch, Paul Georg ; Blum, Torsten ; Bruns, Anja ; Dröge, Michael ; Brinkmann, Gisbert ; Struckmann, Karl ; Nauck, Michael ; Maisonneuve, Patrick ; Lowenfels, Albert B. / Has Blood Glucose Level Measured on Admission to Hospital in a Patient with Acute Pancreatitis Any Prognostic Value?. In: Pancreatology. 2001 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 224-229.
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