He can tell which master craftsman blew a Venetian vase, but he can not name the Pope: A patient with a selective difficulty in naming faces

Carlo Semenza, Giuseppe Sartori, Jessica D'Andrea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A patient with damage to the left fronto-temporal region could not name faces, although his recognition and semantic knowledge of people were found to be intact. At variance with described anomics for persons' names, this patient was able to retrieve on definition names of people whose faces he could not name. When, instead, objects were to be named with a person's name, as in the case of manufacturers of Murano glass, the patient, a Murano glass master, was perfect. That is, he could tell which master craftsman in the famous Venini glass-works in Venice had blown a vase, but he could not identify the Pope from a picture. Naming faces is therefore shown to be independent of naming objects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-75
Number of pages3
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume352
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 27 2003

Keywords

  • Anomia
  • Difficulty in naming faces
  • Prosopoanomia vs prosopoagnosia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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