Headache attributed to intracranial pressure alterations: applicability of the International Classification of Headache Disorders ICHD-3 beta version versus ICHD-2

M. Curone, C. Peccarisi, G. Bussone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The association between headache and changes in intracranial pressure is strong in clinical practice. Syndromes associated with abnormalities of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure include spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). In 2013, the Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society (IHS) published the third International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta version). The aim of this study was to investigate applicability of the new ICHD-3 versus ICHD-2 criteria in a clinical sample of patients with intracranial pressure (ICP) alterations. Patients admitted at our Headache Center for headache evaluation in whom a diagnosis of ICP alterations was performed were reviewed. 71 consecutive patients were studied. 40 patients (Group A) were diagnosed as IIH, 22 (Group B) as SIH, 7 (Group C) and 2 (Group D), respectively, as symptomatic intracranial hypertension and symptomatic intracranial hypotension. Main headache features were: in Group A, daily or nearly-daily headache (100 %) with diffuse/non-pulsating pain (73 %), aggravated by coughing/straining (54 %) and migrainous-associated symptoms (43 %). In Group B, an orthostatic headache (100 %) with nausea (29 %), vomiting (24 %), hearing disturbance (33 %), neck pain (48 %), hypacusia (24 %), photophobia (22 %) was reported. In Group C, a diffuse non-pulsating headache was present in 95 % with vomiting (25 %), sixth nerve palsy (14 %) and tinnitus (29 %). In Group D, an orthostatic headache with neck stiffness was reported by 100 %. Regarding applicability of ICHD-2 criteria in Group A, 73 % of the patients fitted criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 75 %, criterion D; while applying ICHD-3 beta version criteria, 100 % fitted criterion A; 97.5 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 100 %, criterion D. In Group B, application of ICHD-2 showed 91 % patients fitting criterion A; 100 %, criterion B; 100 %, criterion C; and 68 %, criterion D; while applying ICHD-3 beta version all patients, 100 % fitted criterion A, B, C, D. 73 % patients of Group A fitted all ICHD-2 criteria and 97.5 % all ICHD-3 beta version criteria for headache attributed to IIH. 68 % patients of Group B fitted all ICHD-2 criteria and 100 % all ICHD-3 beta version criteria for headache attributed to SIH. In Group C and Group D, although patients fitted some clinical criteria, the underlying disorder caused exclusion of both ICHD-2 and ICHD-3 beta version applicability for headache attributed to IIH and SIH; they were coded in criteria for the secondary headaches. In summary, ICHD-3 beta version seems to have better applicability but worse reliability in defining headache features in CSF alterations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-139
Number of pages3
JournalNeurological Sciences
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 30 2015

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Keywords

  • ICHD-3 beta version
  • Idiopathic intracranial hypertension
  • Intracranial pressure alterations
  • Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Dermatology
  • Medicine(all)

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