Headache yesterday in Europe

Colette Andrée, Timothy J. Steiner, Jessica Barré, Zaza Katsarava, Jose Miguel Lainez, Christian Lampl, Michel Lantéri-Minet, Daiva Rastenyte, Elena Ruiz de la Torre, Cristina Tassorelli, Lars Jacob Stovner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods: Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results: Participation rates varied between 11% and 59% (mean 27%). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2% (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17%, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56% of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6%. Among those who worked despite headache, 20% reported productivity reduced by >50%. Social activities were lost by 24%. Women (21%) were more likely than men (12%) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions: With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7% of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache.

Original languageEnglish
Article number33
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Headache and Pain
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2014

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Headache
Luxembourg
Lithuania
Population
Austria
Leisure Activities
Netherlands
Spain
Italy
France
Germany
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Cost of illness
  • Eurolight project
  • Global Campaign against Headache
  • Headache
  • Impact
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Andrée, C., Steiner, T. J., Barré, J., Katsarava, Z., Lainez, J. M., Lampl, C., ... Stovner, L. J. (2014). Headache yesterday in Europe. Journal of Headache and Pain, 15(1), 1-8. [33]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1129-2377-15-33

Headache yesterday in Europe. / Andrée, Colette; Steiner, Timothy J.; Barré, Jessica; Katsarava, Zaza; Lainez, Jose Miguel; Lampl, Christian; Lantéri-Minet, Michel; Rastenyte, Daiva; Ruiz de la Torre, Elena; Tassorelli, Cristina; Stovner, Lars Jacob.

In: Journal of Headache and Pain, Vol. 15, No. 1, 33, 01.12.2014, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrée, C, Steiner, TJ, Barré, J, Katsarava, Z, Lainez, JM, Lampl, C, Lantéri-Minet, M, Rastenyte, D, Ruiz de la Torre, E, Tassorelli, C & Stovner, LJ 2014, 'Headache yesterday in Europe', Journal of Headache and Pain, vol. 15, no. 1, 33, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1186/1129-2377-15-33
Andrée C, Steiner TJ, Barré J, Katsarava Z, Lainez JM, Lampl C et al. Headache yesterday in Europe. Journal of Headache and Pain. 2014 Dec 1;15(1):1-8. 33. https://doi.org/10.1186/1129-2377-15-33
Andrée, Colette ; Steiner, Timothy J. ; Barré, Jessica ; Katsarava, Zaza ; Lainez, Jose Miguel ; Lampl, Christian ; Lantéri-Minet, Michel ; Rastenyte, Daiva ; Ruiz de la Torre, Elena ; Tassorelli, Cristina ; Stovner, Lars Jacob. / Headache yesterday in Europe. In: Journal of Headache and Pain. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 1-8.
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abstract = "Background: Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods: Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results: Participation rates varied between 11{\%} and 59{\%} (mean 27{\%}). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2{\%} (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17{\%}, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56{\%} of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6{\%}. Among those who worked despite headache, 20{\%} reported productivity reduced by >50{\%}. Social activities were lost by 24{\%}. Women (21{\%}) were more likely than men (12{\%}) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions: With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7{\%} of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache.",
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