Health-related quality of life: Hepatocellular carcinoma, chronic liver disease, and the general population

Jennifer L. Steel, Kapil Chopra, Marion C. Olek, Brian I. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Health related quality of life (HRQL) has become an important endpoint in testing the efficacy of treatments for chronic liver disease (CLD) and the consequences of CLD which include hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver failure. However, a paucity of research on HRQL has been conducted with these patient populations. The aims of the present study were to compare persons diagnosed with HCC to persons diagnosed with CLD as well as with the general population (GP) on a disease-specific instrument measuring HRQL. If significant and clinically meaningful differences in HRQL exist, HRQL may be used as a corroborative indicator of disease progression in patients with CLD. Two hundred and seventy-two people participated in the present study. Of these participants, 83 were diagnosed with HCC, 51 with CLD, and 138 were from the GP. None of the patients in the HCC or CLD samples were actively receiving chemotherapeutic treatments for the CLD or HCC. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep) was administered to participants. The results of the study suggested that people diagnosed with HCC, prior to treatment, had a poorer overall HRQL when compared to those persons with CLD and the general population, as expected. The differences in HRQL were statistically significant as well as clinically meaningful. People diagnosed with CLD and HCC respectively, reported better social and family well-being than the general population. Furthermore, people with CLD reported equivalent emotional well-being as the general population sample. HRQL subscale scores, with the exception of social and family well-being, discriminated group membership.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-215
Number of pages13
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2007

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Nursing(all)

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