Trapianto cardiaco 1985-1995: 10 anni di esperienza al Centro "Angelo De Gasperis". Miglioramento dei risultati mediante l'evoluzione dei criteri operativi

Translated title of the contribution: Heart transplantation 1985-1995: 10-years experience at "Angelo De Gasperis" Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Division. Improvement of results by the progress of medical and surgical management

Tiziano Colombo, Modestina Grassi, Maria Frigerio, Edoardo Gronda, Maurizio Mangiavacchi, Claudio Russo, Ettore Vitali, Mario Merli, Alessandro Pellegrini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND. At 10-years from beginning of transplant experience in our Center we analyzed the overall results in an attempt to identify risk factors for early (3 months) and late (over 3 months) mortality after heart transplantation (HTx). METHODS. The data of 313 patients transplanted from November 1985 to June 1995 were studied and analyzed with a multivariate logistic regression and Cox's proportional hazard model. Seventy pre, intra and postoperative variables were considered: demographics, clinical status, hemodynamic parameters, donor characteristics, donor-recipient mismatch, complications, immunosuppressive protocols. In this paper we compared results in patients operated on from 1985 to 1990 (Group I) and from 1991 to 1995 (Group II) in order to assess improvements due to changes in HTx indication and in perioperative treatments. RESULTS. Overall mortality in the entire group was 19.8% (62/313): 30-days, 3 months and late mortality rates were 8.0%, 10.2%, 10.7% respectively. In Group II mortality rates were 7.1%, 8.6% and 2.8% respectively despite significant increase in Status I patients (21.5% in Group I vs 40.1% in Group II, p = 0.0008). Main causes of early death were: graft failure (46.9%), infection (28.1%), acute rejection (12.5%). Main causes of late death were: cardiac allograft vasculopaty (40.0%) and neoplasm (23.3%). The mean follow-up of the 281 survivors more than 3 months is 45.6 ± 30.0 months (range 3 to 120 months). Actuarial survival is 86.9 ± 1.9%, 78.4 ± 2.7% and 70.7 ± 3.9% at 1, 5 and 10 years respectively. The difference in the 5-years actuarial survival between Group I and Group II patients is statistically significant (70.7 ± 4.2% vs 84.5 ± 4.5%, p = 0.005). TPG (OR 1.19), RAP (OR 1.13) and MD-HD inotropic support of donor (OR 3.81) were identified as independent risk factors for early mortality. Number of moderate rejection at biopsy (OR 1.56) and early postTx infection (OR 3.37) were identified as independent risk factors for late mortality. CONCLUSIONS. The overall results of our ten-year experience are very satisfying in relation to early and late mortality, with a significant favourable trend between patients transplanted in the early era (1985-1990) and those transplanted in the recent era (1991-1995). The study confirm that morbidity and mortality have the highest incidence during the early post-transplantation phase. Pulmonary hypertension and elevated preoperative right filling pressure appear to indicate a significantly increased risk of early death and only marginally influence late survival that is principally related to the severe postoperative complications. Differently from other observations, among the donor-related and recipient-donor matching variables, this analysis evidenced as significant only the need for MD-HD catecolamines during donor-management.

Translated title of the contributionHeart transplantation 1985-1995: 10-years experience at "Angelo De Gasperis" Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Division. Improvement of results by the progress of medical and surgical management
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)3-18
Number of pages16
JournalGiornale Italiano di Cardiologia
Volume27
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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