Helical axis calculation based on Burmester theory: Experimental comparison with traditional techniques for human tibiotalar joint motion

N. Sansini, V. Parenti-Castelli, F. Corazza, A. Leardini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester's theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester's theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1207-1217
Number of pages11
JournalMedical and Biological Engineering and Computing
Volume47
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Orthotics
Jigs
Prosthetics
Skin
Motion analysis

Keywords

  • Burmester theory
  • Helical axis
  • Human joint motion
  • Passive flexion
  • Radiostereometry
  • Single rotation axis
  • Tibiotalar (ankle) joint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Helical axis calculation based on Burmester theory : Experimental comparison with traditional techniques for human tibiotalar joint motion. / Sansini, N.; Parenti-Castelli, V.; Corazza, F.; Leardini, A.

In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, Vol. 47, No. 11, 2009, p. 1207-1217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5307ba3218e64b279dd07ca26c1f6020,
title = "Helical axis calculation based on Burmester theory: Experimental comparison with traditional techniques for human tibiotalar joint motion",
abstract = "In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester's theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester's theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.",
keywords = "Burmester theory, Helical axis, Human joint motion, Passive flexion, Radiostereometry, Single rotation axis, Tibiotalar (ankle) joint",
author = "N. Sansini and V. Parenti-Castelli and F. Corazza and A. Leardini",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1007/s11517-009-0522-4",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "1207--1217",
journal = "Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing",
issn = "0140-0118",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Helical axis calculation based on Burmester theory

T2 - Experimental comparison with traditional techniques for human tibiotalar joint motion

AU - Sansini, N.

AU - Parenti-Castelli, V.

AU - Corazza, F.

AU - Leardini, A.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester's theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester's theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.

AB - In prosthetics and orthotics design, it is sometimes necessary to approximate the multiaxial motion of several human joints to a simple rotation about a single fixed axis. A new technique for the calculation of this axis is proposed, originally based on Burmester's theory. This was compared with traditional approaches based on the mean and finite helical axes. The three techniques were assessed by relevant optimal axis estimation in in vitro measurements of tibiotalar joint motion. A standard jig and radiostereometry were used in two anatomical specimens to obtain accurate measurements of joint flexion. The performance of each technique was determined by comparing the motion based on the resulting axis with the experimental data. Random noise with magnitude typically similar to that of the skin motion was also added to the measured motion. All three techniques performed well in identifying a single rotation axis for tibiotalar joint motion. Burmester's theory provides an additional method for human joint motion analysis, which is particularly robust when experimental data are considerably error affected.

KW - Burmester theory

KW - Helical axis

KW - Human joint motion

KW - Passive flexion

KW - Radiostereometry

KW - Single rotation axis

KW - Tibiotalar (ankle) joint

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70350654374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70350654374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11517-009-0522-4

DO - 10.1007/s11517-009-0522-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 19730914

AN - SCOPUS:70350654374

VL - 47

SP - 1207

EP - 1217

JO - Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

JF - Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing

SN - 0140-0118

IS - 11

ER -