Helping people with multiple disabilities manage an assembly task and mobility via technology-regulated sequence cues and contingent stimulation

Giulio E. Lancioni, Nirbhay N. Singh, Mark F. O'Reilly, Jeff Sigafoos, Francesca Campodonico, Carmen Zimbaro, Gloria Alberti, Grazia Trubia, Tommasa Zagaria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of a technology-aided program providing sequence/space cues and contingent stimulation on object assembling and mobility for eight participants with multiple disabilities. Method: The technology-aided program was introduced according to a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. Pipe components were distributed over different desks. The program served to (a) guide the participants to collect and assemble those components in the right sequence via verbal or light cues automatically emitted by electronic boxes, and (b) deliver preferred stimulation as the participants put away a completed pipe. Results: The participants increased the mean frequencies of pipes assembled and put away accurately and independently from (virtually) zero during the baseline to between about 6 and 14 per 15-min session during the technology-aided program. This performance was maintained at a follow-up check. Twenty-four staff members surveyed about the program provided favorable ratings of it. Conclusions: These data indicate that the program may be an effective tool for supporting people like the participants of this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-163
Number of pages21
JournalLife Span and Disability
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Assembly task
  • Blindness
  • Deafness
  • Mobility
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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