Hepatic gadolinium deposition and reversibility after contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

Natalia Maximova, Massimo Gregori, Floriana Zennaro, Aurelio Sonzogni, Roberto Simeone, Davide Zanon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if hepatic gadolinium deposition occurs in pediatric patients with iron overload but normal renal and hepatic function who undergo gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods: Design and execution of this study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Institute for Research in Maternal and Child Health Burlo Garofolo of Trieste (reference no. 1105/2015). Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Twenty-one recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who underwent GBCA-enhanced MR imaging for suspected infection or relapse followed by liver biopsy comprised the study group. The number of GBCA-enhanced MR examinations and cumulative gadolinium dose for each patient was analyzed by comparing liver histologic analysis and iron and gadolinium liver concentration (GLC). Eight patients had siderosis and underwent chelation therapy. The study group was compared with four control patients who were never exposed to GBCA. Statistical analysis was performed with Spearman rank coefficient for correlation. Results: All 21 patients had positive correlations between GLC and total GBCA dose (r = 0.4486; P< 05) and between GLC and liver iron concentration (r = 0.56; P<.05). Patients who underwent deferoxamine therapy had a significant reduction of GLC (from 0.64 μg/g ± 0.29 to 0.20 μg/g ± 0.17 [standard deviation]; P<.05). Conclusion: In the presence of siderosis, a transmetallation mechanism may be set off between ferric ion and gadoterate meglumine. Deferoxamine appears capable of binding to gadolinium ion. Further studies of the safety of GBCAs in severe siderosis are needed. Chelation should be considered in patients with iron overload and a history of GBCA exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-426
Number of pages9
JournalRadiology
Volume281
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Gadolinium
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Contrast Media
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pediatrics
Transplants
Liver
Siderosis
Deferoxamine
Iron Overload
Transplant Recipients
Iron
Ions
Chelation Therapy
Nonparametric Statistics
Informed Consent
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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Hepatic gadolinium deposition and reversibility after contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. / Maximova, Natalia; Gregori, Massimo; Zennaro, Floriana; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Simeone, Roberto; Zanon, Davide.

In: Radiology, Vol. 281, No. 2, 2016, p. 418-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To determine if hepatic gadolinium deposition occurs in pediatric patients with iron overload but normal renal and hepatic function who undergo gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods: Design and execution of this study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Institute for Research in Maternal and Child Health Burlo Garofolo of Trieste (reference no. 1105/2015). Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Twenty-one recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who underwent GBCA-enhanced MR imaging for suspected infection or relapse followed by liver biopsy comprised the study group. The number of GBCA-enhanced MR examinations and cumulative gadolinium dose for each patient was analyzed by comparing liver histologic analysis and iron and gadolinium liver concentration (GLC). Eight patients had siderosis and underwent chelation therapy. The study group was compared with four control patients who were never exposed to GBCA. Statistical analysis was performed with Spearman rank coefficient for correlation. Results: All 21 patients had positive correlations between GLC and total GBCA dose (r = 0.4486; P< 05) and between GLC and liver iron concentration (r = 0.56; P<.05). Patients who underwent deferoxamine therapy had a significant reduction of GLC (from 0.64 μg/g ± 0.29 to 0.20 μg/g ± 0.17 [standard deviation]; P<.05). Conclusion: In the presence of siderosis, a transmetallation mechanism may be set off between ferric ion and gadoterate meglumine. Deferoxamine appears capable of binding to gadolinium ion. Further studies of the safety of GBCAs in severe siderosis are needed. Chelation should be considered in patients with iron overload and a history of GBCA exposure.",
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AU - Simeone, Roberto

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AB - Purpose: To determine if hepatic gadolinium deposition occurs in pediatric patients with iron overload but normal renal and hepatic function who undergo gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods: Design and execution of this study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Institute for Research in Maternal and Child Health Burlo Garofolo of Trieste (reference no. 1105/2015). Because of the retrospective nature of the study, the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Twenty-one recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants who underwent GBCA-enhanced MR imaging for suspected infection or relapse followed by liver biopsy comprised the study group. The number of GBCA-enhanced MR examinations and cumulative gadolinium dose for each patient was analyzed by comparing liver histologic analysis and iron and gadolinium liver concentration (GLC). Eight patients had siderosis and underwent chelation therapy. The study group was compared with four control patients who were never exposed to GBCA. Statistical analysis was performed with Spearman rank coefficient for correlation. Results: All 21 patients had positive correlations between GLC and total GBCA dose (r = 0.4486; P< 05) and between GLC and liver iron concentration (r = 0.56; P<.05). Patients who underwent deferoxamine therapy had a significant reduction of GLC (from 0.64 μg/g ± 0.29 to 0.20 μg/g ± 0.17 [standard deviation]; P<.05). Conclusion: In the presence of siderosis, a transmetallation mechanism may be set off between ferric ion and gadoterate meglumine. Deferoxamine appears capable of binding to gadolinium ion. Further studies of the safety of GBCAs in severe siderosis are needed. Chelation should be considered in patients with iron overload and a history of GBCA exposure.

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