Hepatitis C virus antibody status and survival after renal transplantation: Meta-analysis of observational studies

Fabrizio Fabrizi, Paul Martin, Vivek Dixit, Suphamai Bunnapradist, Gareth Dulai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among patients after renal transplantation (RT) remains incompletely defined. We conducted a systematic review of the published medical literature on the impact of hepatitis C antibody status on survival of patients who received RT. We used the random effects model of Der-Simonian and Laird to generate a summary estimate of the relative risk (RR) for mortality and graft loss with HCV seropositivity across the published studies. We identified eight clinical trials (6365 unique patients); six (75%) were cohort studies and two (2/8 = 25%) controlled trials, respectively. Pooling of study results demonstrated that presence of anti-HCV antibody was an independent and significant risk factor for death and graft failure after RT; the summary estimate for RR was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.57-2.03; homogeneity test, p = 0.0427) and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.35-1.80; homogeneity test, p = 0.0192), respectively. As a cause of death, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver cirrhosis were significantly more frequent among anti-HCV positive than anti-HCV negative RT patients. This meta-analysis demonstrates that RT recipients with anti-HCV antibody have an increased risk of mortality and graft failure compared with HCV antibody negative patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1452-1461
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C Antibodies
Kidney Transplantation
Observational Studies
Meta-Analysis
Hepacivirus
Survival
Transplants
Mortality
Natural History
Liver Cirrhosis
Cause of Death
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Cohort Studies
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Anti-HCV antibody
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Meta-analysis
  • Mortality
  • Renal transplantation
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Hepatitis C virus antibody status and survival after renal transplantation : Meta-analysis of observational studies. / Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Martin, Paul; Dixit, Vivek; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Dulai, Gareth.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 5, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 1452-1461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fabrizi, Fabrizio ; Martin, Paul ; Dixit, Vivek ; Bunnapradist, Suphamai ; Dulai, Gareth. / Hepatitis C virus antibody status and survival after renal transplantation : Meta-analysis of observational studies. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2005 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 1452-1461.
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