Hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection in a cohort of HIV positive long-term non-progressors: Possible protective effect of infecting HCV genotype on HIV disease progression

Giulia Morsica, Sabrina Bagaglio, Silvia Ghezzi, Chiara Lodrini, Elisa Vicenzi, Elena Santagostino, Alessandro Gringeri, Marco Cusini, Guido Carminati, Giampaolo Bianchi, Laura Galli, Adriano Lazzarin, Guido Poli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and objective: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in HIV-positive subjects. We evaluated the potential impact of HCV coinfection and other determinants on HIV disease progression in a cohort of long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). Study design: We studied immunological and virological factors in a cohort of 49 LTNPs, 23 of whom progressed during the follow-up (late progressors; LPs). Results: HCV coinfection was detected in 19/26 LTNPs and 15/23 LPs. Univariate analysis showed that HIV viral load was associated with disease progression (P = 0.04), and time-to-event analysis indicated that HCV genotype 1 significantly correlated with LTNP status (P = 0.031). At multivariate analysis, HIV viremia at study entry remained independently associated with LTNP status (P = 0.049). When the most represented genotypes (1 and 3a) were considered in the model, genotype 3a infection (P = 0.034) and gender (P = 0.035) emerged as independent variables related to HIV disease progression, whereas HIV viral load disappeared. Conclusions: In addition to HIV viremia, coinfection with different HCV genotypes and gender may affect LTNP status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-86
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Keywords

  • HCV genotype
  • HIV disease progression
  • HIV load
  • LTNPs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Virology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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