Hepatitis C virus infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia.

Gianfranco Lauletta, Sabino Russi, Vincenza Conteduca, Loredana Sansonno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection is recognized as the major cause of mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). Its persistence represents a continuous stimulus for host immune system with production of circulating immune complexes (ICs), one-third of them with cryoprecipitate property. Several factors contribute to the biological activities of ICs, many of which are not completely known. Among them, complement factors play a crucial role in the cold-insoluble ICs-mediated vasculitis, involving primarily small blood vessels in different tissues including skin, kidney, peripheral, and central nervous system. Liver represents the major target of HCV infection with inflammatory infiltrates, resembling secondary lymphoid follicles. Cytokine like CXCL13 contribute to B-cell homing in intraportal lymphoid aggregates, in which B-cell clonal selection may arise. B-cell clonal expansion starts as an antigen-driven event and expands towards indolent and malignant B-cell proliferation. Occurrence of intrahepatic B-cell clonalities correlates with extrahepatic clinical manifestations of HCV infection. In this context, cryoglobulinemic patients should be considered a peculiar HCV-infected population that needs a clinical multidisciplinary approach and more articulated therapeutic measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502156
Number of pages1
JournalClinical and Developmental Immunology
Volume2012
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Cryoglobulinemia
Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
B-Lymphocytes
Antigen-Antibody Complex
Peripheral Nervous System
Vasculitis
Blood Vessels
Immune System
Central Nervous System
Cell Proliferation
Cytokines
Kidney
Antigens
Skin
Liver
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hepatitis C virus infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia. / Lauletta, Gianfranco; Russi, Sabino; Conteduca, Vincenza; Sansonno, Loredana.

In: Clinical and Developmental Immunology, Vol. 2012, 2012, p. 502156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lauletta, Gianfranco ; Russi, Sabino ; Conteduca, Vincenza ; Sansonno, Loredana. / Hepatitis C virus infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia. In: Clinical and Developmental Immunology. 2012 ; Vol. 2012. pp. 502156.
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