Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients

Massimiliano Berretta, Paolo De Paoli, Umberto Tirelli, Bruno Cacopardo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary tumor of the liver that arises from hepatocytes. The principal factors that increase the risk of HCC include infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholism, and aflatoxin. Patients with HIV infection also have an increased risk of HCC, but the role of HIV and immunosuppression is unclear, and much of this risk appears to be because of co-infection with HBV and/or HCV. Whether HIV plays a direct role in HCC pathogenesis remains to be established, but it can increase the risk of HCC in individuals co-infected with HBV and/or HCV. The clinical course of HCC depends on stage of cancer disease, performance status, and comorbidities. Therapeutic options include liver transplantation, local antiblastic chemotherapy, and biological agents. In the HIV setting few data are available about treatment options. The increased longevity of patients with HIV appears to be contributing to an increased incidence of HCC in this population and imposes new strategies for prevention and therapeutic management of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages313-325
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781493908592, 1493908588, 9781493908585
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2014

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Hepatocellular Carcinoma
HIV
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
Aflatoxins
Biological Factors
Virus Diseases
Coinfection
Liver Transplantation
Immunosuppression
Alcoholism
HIV Infections
Comorbidity
Hepatocytes
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy
Liver
Incidence
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Berretta, M., De Paoli, P., Tirelli, U., & Cacopardo, B. (2014). Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients. In Cancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges (pp. 313-325). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0859-2_23

Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients. / Berretta, Massimiliano; De Paoli, Paolo; Tirelli, Umberto; Cacopardo, Bruno.

Cancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges. Springer New York, 2014. p. 313-325.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Berretta, M, De Paoli, P, Tirelli, U & Cacopardo, B 2014, Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients. in Cancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges. Springer New York, pp. 313-325. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0859-2_23
Berretta M, De Paoli P, Tirelli U, Cacopardo B. Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients. In Cancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges. Springer New York. 2014. p. 313-325 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0859-2_23
Berretta, Massimiliano ; De Paoli, Paolo ; Tirelli, Umberto ; Cacopardo, Bruno. / Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-positive patients. Cancers in People with HIV and AIDS: Progress and Challenges. Springer New York, 2014. pp. 313-325
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