High-flow nasal cannula: Transient fashion or new method of non-invasive ventilatory assistance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Respiratory failure in the premature infants remains a difficult challenge. An alternative to the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a non-invasive modality to support respiratory distress in premature infants has been the recent introduction of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) devices in many neonatal units. There has been increased use of HFNC presumably because of anecdotal reports and experience that it is easy to use, and well tolerated by the infants, while experiencing decreased nasal septumerosion. The paucity of evidenceregarding its efficacy and safety, would support a caution approach to the use of HFNC. Particularconcern hasfocused on the imprecise regulation and generation of pressure that may occur at higher flows especially in the smallest of infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-61
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume25
Issue numberSUPPL.4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure
Nose
Respiratory Insufficiency
Safety
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies
Cannula

Keywords

  • High flow nasal cannula
  • Non invasive ventilatory support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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abstract = "Respiratory failure in the premature infants remains a difficult challenge. An alternative to the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a non-invasive modality to support respiratory distress in premature infants has been the recent introduction of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) devices in many neonatal units. There has been increased use of HFNC presumably because of anecdotal reports and experience that it is easy to use, and well tolerated by the infants, while experiencing decreased nasal septumerosion. The paucity of evidenceregarding its efficacy and safety, would support a caution approach to the use of HFNC. Particularconcern hasfocused on the imprecise regulation and generation of pressure that may occur at higher flows especially in the smallest of infants.",
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AB - Respiratory failure in the premature infants remains a difficult challenge. An alternative to the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) as a non-invasive modality to support respiratory distress in premature infants has been the recent introduction of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) devices in many neonatal units. There has been increased use of HFNC presumably because of anecdotal reports and experience that it is easy to use, and well tolerated by the infants, while experiencing decreased nasal septumerosion. The paucity of evidenceregarding its efficacy and safety, would support a caution approach to the use of HFNC. Particularconcern hasfocused on the imprecise regulation and generation of pressure that may occur at higher flows especially in the smallest of infants.

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