High-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) in the human non-parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus

S. F. Danish, J. T. Moyer, L. H. Finkel, G. H. Baltuch, J. L. Jaggi, A. Priori, G. Foffani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The human basal ganglia, and in particular the subthalamic nucleus (STN), can oscillate at surprisingly high frequencies, around 300 Hz [G. Foffani, A. Priori, M. Egidi, P. Rampini, F. Tamma, E. Caputo, K.A. Moxon, S. Cerutti, S. Barbieri, 300-Hz subthalamic oscillations in Parkinson's disease, Brain 126 (2003) 2153-2163]. It has been proposed that these oscillations could contribute to the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation (DBS) [G. Foffani, A. Priori, Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease can mimic the 300 Hz subthalamic rhythm, Brain 129 (2006) E59]. However, the physiological role of high-frequency STN oscillations is questionable, because they have been observed only in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and could therefore be secondary to the dopamine-depleted parkinsonian state. Here, we report high-frequency STN oscillations in the range of the 300-Hz rhythm during intraoperative microrecordings for DBS in an awake patient with focal dystonia as well as in a patient with essential tremor (ET). High-frequency STN oscillations are therefore not exclusively related to parkinsonian pathophysiology, but may represent a broader feature of human STN function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-90
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume74
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 14 2007

Fingerprint

Subthalamic Nucleus
Deep Brain Stimulation
Parkinson Disease
moxonidine
Essential Tremor
Dystonic Disorders
Brain
Basal Ganglia
Dopamine

Keywords

  • DBS
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • High-frequency oscillations
  • Human
  • STN
  • Subthalamic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Danish, S. F., Moyer, J. T., Finkel, L. H., Baltuch, G. H., Jaggi, J. L., Priori, A., & Foffani, G. (2007). High-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) in the human non-parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus. Brain Research Bulletin, 74(1-3), 84-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2007.05.006

High-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) in the human non-parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus. / Danish, S. F.; Moyer, J. T.; Finkel, L. H.; Baltuch, G. H.; Jaggi, J. L.; Priori, A.; Foffani, G.

In: Brain Research Bulletin, Vol. 74, No. 1-3, 14.09.2007, p. 84-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Danish, SF, Moyer, JT, Finkel, LH, Baltuch, GH, Jaggi, JL, Priori, A & Foffani, G 2007, 'High-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) in the human non-parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus', Brain Research Bulletin, vol. 74, no. 1-3, pp. 84-90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2007.05.006
Danish, S. F. ; Moyer, J. T. ; Finkel, L. H. ; Baltuch, G. H. ; Jaggi, J. L. ; Priori, A. ; Foffani, G. / High-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) in the human non-parkinsonian subthalamic nucleus. In: Brain Research Bulletin. 2007 ; Vol. 74, No. 1-3. pp. 84-90.
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