High genomic instability predicts survival in metastatic high-risk neuroblastoma

Sara Stigliani, Simona Coco, Stefano Moretti, Andrè Oberthuer, Mattias Fischer, Jessica Theissen, Fabio Gallo, Alberto Garaventa, Frank Berthold, Stefano Bonassi, Gian Paolo Tonini Dr., Paola Scaruffi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We aimed to identify novel molecular prognostic markers to better predict relapse risk estimate for children with high-risk (HR) metastatic neuroblastoma (NB). We performed genome- and/or transcriptome-wide analyses of 129 stage 4 HR NBs. Children older than 1 year of age were categorized as "short survivors" (dead of disease within 5 years from diagnosis) and "long survivors" (alive with an overall survival time ≥ 5 years). We reported that patients with less than three segmental copy number aberrations in their tumor represent a molecularly defined subgroup with a high survival probability within the current HR group of patients. The complex genomic pattern is a prognostic marker independent of NB-associated chromosomal aberrations, i.e., MYCN amplification, 1p and 11q losses, and 17q gain. Integrative analysis of genomic and expression signatures demonstrated that fatal outcome is mainly associated with loss of cell cycle control and deregulation of Rho guanosine triphosphates (GTPases) functioning in neuritogenesis. Tumors with MYCN amplification show a lower chromosome instability compared to MYCN single-copy NBs (P =.0008), dominated by 17q gain and 1p loss. Moreover, our results suggest that the MYCN amplification mainly drives disruption of neuronal differentiation and reduction of cell adhesion process involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. Further validation studies are warranted to establish this as a risk stratification for patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)823-832
Number of pages10
JournalNeoplasia (United States)
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'High genomic instability predicts survival in metastatic high-risk neuroblastoma'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this