High-pass filtering and dynamic gain regulation enhance vertical bursts transmission along the mossy fiber pathway of cerebellum

Jonathan Mapelli, Daniela Gandolfi, Egidio D'Angelo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Signal elaboration in the cerebellum mossy fiber input pathway presents controversial aspects, especially concerning gain regulation and the spot-like (rather than beam-like) appearance of granular to molecular layer transmission. By using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in rat cerebellar slices (Mapelli et al., 2010), we found that mossy fiber bursts optimally excited the granular layer above ~50 Hz and the overlaying molecular layer above ~100 Hz, thus generating a cascade of high-pass filters. NMDA receptors enhanced transmission in the granular, while GABA-A receptors depressed transmission in both the granular and molecular layer. Burst transmission gain was controlled through a dynamic frequency-dependent involvement of these receptors. Moreover, while high-frequency transmission was enhanced along vertical lines connecting the granular to molecular layer, no high-frequency enhancement was observed along the parallel fiber axis in the molecular layer. This was probably due to the stronger effect of Purkinje cell GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition occurring along the parallel fibers than along the granule cell axon ascending branch. The consequent amplification of burst responses along vertical transmission lines could explain the spot-like activation of Purkinje cells observed following punctuate stimulation in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14
JournalFrontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Volume4
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 28 2010

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Purkinje Cells
GABA-A Receptors
Cerebellum
Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Axons

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • GABA-A receptors
  • Gain control
  • Imaging
  • NMDA receptors
  • Voltage-sensitive dye

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

High-pass filtering and dynamic gain regulation enhance vertical bursts transmission along the mossy fiber pathway of cerebellum. / Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; D'Angelo, Egidio.

In: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, Vol. 4, No. MAY, 14, 28.05.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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