High prevalence of acquired antimicrobial resistance unrelated to heavy antimicrobial consumption

Alessandro Bartoloni, Filippo Bartalesi, Antonia Mantella, Emanuela Dell'Amico, Mimmo Roselli, Marianne Strohmeyer, Herlan Gamboa Barahona, Virgilio Prieto Barrón, Franco Paradisi, Gian Maria Rossolini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In a very remote rural Bolivian community where the use of antimicrobials has been minimal and where exchanges with the exterior are very limited, 67% of subjects were found to be carriers of fecal Escherichia coli with acquired resistance to ≥1 antimicrobial agent(s); the highest rates were observed for tetracycline (64%), ampicillin (58%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (50%), and chloramphenicol (41%). The most relevant implication of these findings is that, in certain settings, the spread and maintenance of antimicrobial resistance can occur, regardless of whether selective pressure generated by the use of antimicrobials is present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1291-1294
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume189
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

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