High prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in commensal bacteria from human populations living in urban and rural areas of Bolivia

Alessandro Bartoloni, Marta Benedetti, Herlan Gamboa, Esteban Salazar, Gian Maria Rossolini, Franco Paradisi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials represents a global public health problem, that undermines the efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The emergence and spread of resistance are universally acknowledged to be associated with heavy consumption of antimicrobials in clinical and veterinary practices. A combination of misuse and overuse of antimicrobial agents, along with poor sanitation, are among the claimed reasons for the exceedingly high resistance rates observed in low-resource countries. However, several aspects concerning the impact of antimicrobial usage remain poorly understood. Some studies conducted in Bolivia in '80-'90 years evidenced a high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in commensal bacteria from human populations living in urban and rural areas. The selective pressure generated by widespread and inappropriate usage was considered the main responsible for these findings. However, an unexpected remarkable high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance detected in the commensal Escherichia coli microbiota of the human population of a very remote rural community, raises the question about the origin of the emergence and spreading of bacterial resistance. These findings suggest that, at least in certain settings and for some resistance determinants, a significant spread of antimicrobial resistance can take place regardless of the overuse/misuse of antimicrobial agents in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-55
Number of pages11
JournalGiornale Italiano di Medicina Tropicale
Volume9
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Bolivia
  • Commensal bacteria
  • Escherichia coli
  • Low-resource countries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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    Bartoloni, A., Benedetti, M., Gamboa, H., Salazar, E., Rossolini, G. M., & Paradisi, F. (2004). High prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in commensal bacteria from human populations living in urban and rural areas of Bolivia. Giornale Italiano di Medicina Tropicale, 9(3-4), 45-55.