High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Observational Study

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Abstract

Background. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays a key role in acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. We explored the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and AKI in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods. We prospectively included 2,063 AMI patients in whom hs-CRP was measured at admission. AKI incidence and a clinical composite of in-hospital death, cardiogenic shock, and acute pulmonary edema were the study endpoints. Results. Two-hundred-thirty-four (11%) patients developed AKI. hs-CRP levels were higher in AKI patients (45 ± 87 vs. 16 ± 41 mg/L; p < 0.0001). The incidence and severity of AKI, as well as the rate of the composite endpoint, increased in parallel with hs-CRP quartiles (p for trend <0.0001 for all comparisons). A significant correlation was found between hs-CRP and the maximal increase of serum creatinine (R = 0.23; p < 0.0001). The AUC of hs-CRP for AKI prediction was 0.69 (p < 0.001). At reclassification analysis, addition of hs-CRP allowed to properly reclassify 14% of patients when added to creatinine and 8% of patients when added to a clinical model. Conclusions. In AMI, admission hs-CRP is closely associated with AKI development and severity, and with in-hospital outcomes. Future research should focus on whether prophylactic renal strategies in patients with high hs-CRP might prevent AKI and improve outcome.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume8
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 12 2019

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