Histomorphometric bone modifications induced by growth hormone treatment in a rabbit model of short bowel syndrome

R. Giardino, P. Torricelli, G. Giavaresi, M. Fini, N. Nicoli Aldini, G. Ruggeri, M. Lima, A. Carpi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on cancellous and cortical bone were investigated in an experimental rabbit model of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Eighteen young male New Zealand rabbits, 2.0 ± 0.2 kg b.w., were divided into three groups: an SBS Group submitted to a 70% midjejunoileal enterectomy and reanastomosis; an SBS-GH Group undergoing the same surgery and receiving 0.4 mg/kg/day rhGH for 28 days; a Control Group which was sham-operated. Thirty-five days after surgery, all the animals were pharmacologically euthanised and their femurs and L5 vertebrae were used for densitometric and histomorphometric studies. Vertebral and femoral densitometric results showed that the SBS Group presented significantly (P <0.01) lower values (10-25%) than the Control and SBS-GH Groups. Significant differences in the cancellous histomorphometric parameters, namely the trabecular bone area (-7% to 46%), trabecular thickness (-21% to 34%) and trabecular separation (17-32%), were observed between the SBS Group and the other groups. Both the SBS and SBS-GH Groups showed significantly (P <0.05) higher values than the Control Group in terms of cross-sectional area (∼24%), cortical area (∼20%), and periosteal perimeter (∼9%), while medullary area (41%) and endocortical perimeter (18%) were significantly higher (P <0.05) in SBS Group than those of Control Group. The current findings are encouraging and suggest that GH administration in SBS animal model used may improve skeletal tissue remodelling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalBiomedicine and Pharmacotherapy
Volume58
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2004

Fingerprint

Short Bowel Syndrome
Growth Hormone
Rabbits
Bone and Bones
Human Growth Hormone
Control Groups
Thigh
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Femur
Spine
Theoretical Models
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Growth hormone
  • Rabbit
  • Short bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Histomorphometric bone modifications induced by growth hormone treatment in a rabbit model of short bowel syndrome. / Giardino, R.; Torricelli, P.; Giavaresi, G.; Fini, M.; Aldini, N. Nicoli; Ruggeri, G.; Lima, M.; Carpi, A.

In: Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 58, No. 2, 03.2004, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on cancellous and cortical bone were investigated in an experimental rabbit model of short bowel syndrome (SBS). Eighteen young male New Zealand rabbits, 2.0 ± 0.2 kg b.w., were divided into three groups: an SBS Group submitted to a 70{\%} midjejunoileal enterectomy and reanastomosis; an SBS-GH Group undergoing the same surgery and receiving 0.4 mg/kg/day rhGH for 28 days; a Control Group which was sham-operated. Thirty-five days after surgery, all the animals were pharmacologically euthanised and their femurs and L5 vertebrae were used for densitometric and histomorphometric studies. Vertebral and femoral densitometric results showed that the SBS Group presented significantly (P <0.01) lower values (10-25{\%}) than the Control and SBS-GH Groups. Significant differences in the cancellous histomorphometric parameters, namely the trabecular bone area (-7{\%} to 46{\%}), trabecular thickness (-21{\%} to 34{\%}) and trabecular separation (17-32{\%}), were observed between the SBS Group and the other groups. Both the SBS and SBS-GH Groups showed significantly (P <0.05) higher values than the Control Group in terms of cross-sectional area (∼24{\%}), cortical area (∼20{\%}), and periosteal perimeter (∼9{\%}), while medullary area (41{\%}) and endocortical perimeter (18{\%}) were significantly higher (P <0.05) in SBS Group than those of Control Group. The current findings are encouraging and suggest that GH administration in SBS animal model used may improve skeletal tissue remodelling.",
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