HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells

Maura Rossetti, Mariangela Cavarelli, Silvia Gregori, Gabriella Scarlatti

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) have the potential to mediate stable therapeutic gene transfer. However, similarly to other viral vectors, their benefit is compromised by the induction of an immune response toward transgene-expressing cells that closely mimics antiviral immunity. LV share with the parental HIV the ability to activate dendritic cells (DC), while lack the peculiar ability of subverting DC functions, which is responsible for HIV immune escape. Understanding the interaction between LV and DC, with plasmacytoid and myeloid DC playing fundamental and distinct roles, has paved the way to novel approaches aimed at regulating transgene-specific immune responses. Thanks to the ability to target either DC subsets LV might be a powerful tool to induce immunity (i.e., gene therapy of cancer), cell death (i.e., in HIV/AIDS infection), or tolerance (i.e., gene therapy strategies for monogenic diseases). In this chapter, similarities and differences between the LV-mediated and HIV-mediated induction of immune responses, with specific focus on their interactions with DC, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Pages239-261
Number of pages23
Volume762
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume762
ISSN (Print)00652598

Fingerprint

Gene therapy
Gene Targeting
Genetic Therapy
Dendritic Cells
HIV
Transgenes
Immunity
Gene transfer
Cell death
Myeloid Cells
Viruses
HIV Infections
Antiviral Agents
HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cell Death
Genes
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rossetti, M., Cavarelli, M., Gregori, S., & Scarlatti, G. (2013). HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (Vol. 762, pp. 239-261). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 762). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4433-6-9

HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells. / Rossetti, Maura; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Gregori, Silvia; Scarlatti, Gabriella.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 762 2013. p. 239-261 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 762).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rossetti, M, Cavarelli, M, Gregori, S & Scarlatti, G 2013, HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. vol. 762, Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 762, pp. 239-261. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4433-6-9
Rossetti M, Cavarelli M, Gregori S, Scarlatti G. HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 762. 2013. p. 239-261. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-4433-6-9
Rossetti, Maura ; Cavarelli, Mariangela ; Gregori, Silvia ; Scarlatti, Gabriella. / HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Vol. 762 2013. pp. 239-261 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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