Home or away? Choosing a setting for a falls-prevention program for people with multiple sclerosis

Hilary Gunn, Davide Cattaneo, Marcia Finlayson, Jennifer Freeman, Jacob J. Sosnoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evidence suggests that choice of setting may be important in influencing the outcomes of rehabilitation programs, as well as optimizing participant satisfaction and adherence. This article aims to examine the factors that may inform the choice of setting for a falls-prevention program tailored to the needs of people with multiple sclerosis, including the influence of setting on program effectiveness, participant engagement, cost, and sustainability. Any new program should ensure that the choice of setting is informed by the intended program outcomes as well as an awareness of the opportunities and challenges presented by each type of setting. Evaluations of falls programs for older people suggest that immediate outcomes are similar regardless of setting; however, long-term outcomes may differ by setting, possibly owing to differential effects on adherence. Programs based away from home may offer benefits in terms of maintaining motivation, providing peer-support opportunities, and allowing regular access to facilitator input, while home-based programs offer unique opportunities for context-based practice and the integration of fallsprevention activities into real life. Additionally, home-based programs may address some of the long-term feasibility issues associated with programs away from home. A "mixed" program incorporating elements of home- and community-based activity may be the most sustainable and effective choice to achieve both longand short-term goals within a falls-prevention program. However, currently there are significant gaps in knowledge relating to comparative program outcomes, cost, and long-term sustainability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-191
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of MS Care
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this