Homotopic reduction in laser-evoked potential amplitude and laser-pain rating by abdominal acupuncture

Massimiliano Valeriani, Stefano Liguori, Catello Vollono, Elisa Testani, Sergio Bangrazi, Filomena Petti, Aldo Liguori, Marco Germanotta, Luca Padua, Costanza Pazzaglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The neural mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of acupuncture is largely unknown. We aimed at investigating the effect of abdominal acupuncture (AA) on the laser-evoked potential (LEP) amplitude and laser-pain rating to stimulation of body parts either homotopic or heterotopic to the treated acupoint. Methods: Laser-evoked potentials were recorded from 13 healthy subjects to stimulation of the right wrist (RW), left wrist (LW) and right foot (RF). LEPs were obtained before, during and after the AA stimulation of an abdominal area corresponding to the representation of the RW. Subjective laser-pain rating was collected after each LEP recording. Results: The amplitude of the N2/P2 LEP component was significantly reduced during AA and 15 min after needle removal to both RW (F = 4.14, p =.02) and LW (F = 5.48, p =.008) stimulation, while the N2/P2 amplitude to RF stimulation (F = 0.94, p =.4) remained unchanged. Laser-pain rating was reduced during AA and 15 min after needle removal only to RW stimulation (F = 5.67, p =.007). Conclusion: Our findings showing an AA effect on LEP components to both the ipsilateral and contralateral region homotopic to the treated area, without any LEP change to stimulation of a heterotopic region, suggest that the AA analgesia is mediated by a segmental spinal mechanism. Significance: Although abdominal acupuncture has demonstrated to be effective in the reduction in laser-evoked potential (LEP) amplitude and laser-pain rating, the exact mechanism of this analgesic effect is not known. In the current study, we found that treatment of an area in the “turtle representation” of the body led to a topographical pattern of LEP amplitude inhibition that can be mediated by a segmental spinal mechanism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Pain (United Kingdom)
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Dec 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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