How are the interests of incapacitated research participants protected through legislation? An Italian study on legal agency for dementia patients

Sabina Gainotti, Susanna Fusari Imperatori, Stefania Spila-Alegiani, Laura Maggiore, Francesca Galeotti, Nicola Vanacore, Carlo Petrini, Roberto Raschetti, Claudio Mariani, Francesca Clerici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Patients with dementia may have limited capacity to give informed consent to participate in clinical research. One possible way to safeguard the patients' interests in research is the involvement of a proxy in the recruitment process. In Italy, the system of proxy is determined by the courts. In this study we evaluate the timing for appointment of a legal proxy in Italy and identify predictive variables of appointment. Methodology/Principal Findings: Subjects were recruited among the outpatients seeking medical advice for cognitive complaints at the Centre for Research and Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunctions, University of Milan, "Luigi Sacco" Hospital. The Centre was participating to the AdCare Study, a no-profit randomised clinical trial coordinated by the Italian National Institute of Health. The requirement that informed consent be given by a legal representative dramatically slowed down the recruitment process in AdCare, which was prematurely interrupted. The Centre for Research and Treatment of Cognitive Dysfunctions collected data on the timing required to appoint the legal representatives. Patients diagnosed with dementia and their caregivers were provided information on the Italian law on legal agency (law 6/2004). At each scheduled check-up the caregiver was asked whether she/he had applied to appoint a legal proxy for the patient and the time interval between the presentation of the law, the registration of the application at the law court chancellery and the sentence of appointment was registered. The study involved 169 demented patients. Seventy-eight patients (46.2%) applied to appoint a legal proxy. These subjects were usually younger, had been suffering from dementia for a longer time, had less than two children and made more use of memantine. The mean interval time between the presentation of the law and the patients' application to the law court chancellery was two months. The mean interval time between the patient's application to the law court chancellery and the sentence of appointment was four months. Conclusions/Significance: In Italy the requirement that legal representatives be appointed by the courts slows down subjects' participation in research. Other procedures for legal agency of the incapacitated patients may be adopted, taking as examples other EU countries' systems.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere11150
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

dementia
Legislation
laws and regulations
Dementia
Proxy
Research
Appointments and Schedules
Italy
Memantine
Informed Consent
health care workers
Caregivers
Profitability
Health
National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
randomized clinical trials
profits and margins
Outpatients
Randomized Controlled Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gainotti, S., Imperatori, S. F., Spila-Alegiani, S., Maggiore, L., Galeotti, F., Vanacore, N., ... Clerici, F. (2010). How are the interests of incapacitated research participants protected through legislation? An Italian study on legal agency for dementia patients. PLoS One, 5(6), [e11150]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011150

How are the interests of incapacitated research participants protected through legislation? An Italian study on legal agency for dementia patients. / Gainotti, Sabina; Imperatori, Susanna Fusari; Spila-Alegiani, Stefania; Maggiore, Laura; Galeotti, Francesca; Vanacore, Nicola; Petrini, Carlo; Raschetti, Roberto; Mariani, Claudio; Clerici, Francesca.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 6, e11150, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gainotti, S, Imperatori, SF, Spila-Alegiani, S, Maggiore, L, Galeotti, F, Vanacore, N, Petrini, C, Raschetti, R, Mariani, C & Clerici, F 2010, 'How are the interests of incapacitated research participants protected through legislation? An Italian study on legal agency for dementia patients', PLoS One, vol. 5, no. 6, e11150. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011150
Gainotti, Sabina ; Imperatori, Susanna Fusari ; Spila-Alegiani, Stefania ; Maggiore, Laura ; Galeotti, Francesca ; Vanacore, Nicola ; Petrini, Carlo ; Raschetti, Roberto ; Mariani, Claudio ; Clerici, Francesca. / How are the interests of incapacitated research participants protected through legislation? An Italian study on legal agency for dementia patients. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6.
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AU - Galeotti, Francesca

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