How long is the recovery of global aphasia? twenty-five years of follow-up in a patient with left hemisphere stroke

Nicola Smania, Marialuisa Gandolfi, Salvatore Maria Aglioti, Paolo Girardi, Antonio Fiaschi, Flavia Girardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Current knowledge regarding the time course of aphasia recovery is based on observations limited to the first years after stroke. Objective. The authors studied long-term outcome (25 years) of language in a patient with global aphasia. Methods. A 37-year-old man with global aphasia from a large ischemic lesion in the left middle cerebral artery territory was tested 9 times between 3 weeks and 25 years poststroke by means of the Milan Language Examination, Token Test, Raven Test, and apraxia tests. Results. Three main periods of recovery were identified. The first year after stroke was characterized by recovery of verbal comprehension and word repetition. From 1 to 3 years, naming and reading improved. From 3 to 25 years, progressive improvement of previously emerged functions was found, as well as the appearance of spontaneous speech. Conclusions. This unique long-term follow-up shows that the time span for recovery of language functions in global aphasia after stroke may be much longer than previously documented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)871-875
Number of pages5
JournalNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Aphasia
Stroke
Language
Apraxias
Crows
Recovery of Function
Middle Cerebral Artery
Reading

Keywords

  • cerebrovascular disorders
  • language
  • outcome
  • rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology

Cite this

How long is the recovery of global aphasia? twenty-five years of follow-up in a patient with left hemisphere stroke. / Smania, Nicola; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Girardi, Paolo; Fiaschi, Antonio; Girardi, Flavia.

In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Vol. 24, No. 9, 11.2010, p. 871-875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smania, Nicola ; Gandolfi, Marialuisa ; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria ; Girardi, Paolo ; Fiaschi, Antonio ; Girardi, Flavia. / How long is the recovery of global aphasia? twenty-five years of follow-up in a patient with left hemisphere stroke. In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 871-875.
@article{61153344b53a494d863b0d72880fa1fb,
title = "How long is the recovery of global aphasia? twenty-five years of follow-up in a patient with left hemisphere stroke",
abstract = "Background. Current knowledge regarding the time course of aphasia recovery is based on observations limited to the first years after stroke. Objective. The authors studied long-term outcome (25 years) of language in a patient with global aphasia. Methods. A 37-year-old man with global aphasia from a large ischemic lesion in the left middle cerebral artery territory was tested 9 times between 3 weeks and 25 years poststroke by means of the Milan Language Examination, Token Test, Raven Test, and apraxia tests. Results. Three main periods of recovery were identified. The first year after stroke was characterized by recovery of verbal comprehension and word repetition. From 1 to 3 years, naming and reading improved. From 3 to 25 years, progressive improvement of previously emerged functions was found, as well as the appearance of spontaneous speech. Conclusions. This unique long-term follow-up shows that the time span for recovery of language functions in global aphasia after stroke may be much longer than previously documented.",
keywords = "cerebrovascular disorders, language, outcome, rehabilitation",
author = "Nicola Smania and Marialuisa Gandolfi and Aglioti, {Salvatore Maria} and Paolo Girardi and Antonio Fiaschi and Flavia Girardi",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1177/1545968310368962",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "871--875",
journal = "Journal of Neurologic Rehabilitation",
issn = "1545-9683",
publisher = "Sage Science Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How long is the recovery of global aphasia? twenty-five years of follow-up in a patient with left hemisphere stroke

AU - Smania, Nicola

AU - Gandolfi, Marialuisa

AU - Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

AU - Girardi, Paolo

AU - Fiaschi, Antonio

AU - Girardi, Flavia

PY - 2010/11

Y1 - 2010/11

N2 - Background. Current knowledge regarding the time course of aphasia recovery is based on observations limited to the first years after stroke. Objective. The authors studied long-term outcome (25 years) of language in a patient with global aphasia. Methods. A 37-year-old man with global aphasia from a large ischemic lesion in the left middle cerebral artery territory was tested 9 times between 3 weeks and 25 years poststroke by means of the Milan Language Examination, Token Test, Raven Test, and apraxia tests. Results. Three main periods of recovery were identified. The first year after stroke was characterized by recovery of verbal comprehension and word repetition. From 1 to 3 years, naming and reading improved. From 3 to 25 years, progressive improvement of previously emerged functions was found, as well as the appearance of spontaneous speech. Conclusions. This unique long-term follow-up shows that the time span for recovery of language functions in global aphasia after stroke may be much longer than previously documented.

AB - Background. Current knowledge regarding the time course of aphasia recovery is based on observations limited to the first years after stroke. Objective. The authors studied long-term outcome (25 years) of language in a patient with global aphasia. Methods. A 37-year-old man with global aphasia from a large ischemic lesion in the left middle cerebral artery territory was tested 9 times between 3 weeks and 25 years poststroke by means of the Milan Language Examination, Token Test, Raven Test, and apraxia tests. Results. Three main periods of recovery were identified. The first year after stroke was characterized by recovery of verbal comprehension and word repetition. From 1 to 3 years, naming and reading improved. From 3 to 25 years, progressive improvement of previously emerged functions was found, as well as the appearance of spontaneous speech. Conclusions. This unique long-term follow-up shows that the time span for recovery of language functions in global aphasia after stroke may be much longer than previously documented.

KW - cerebrovascular disorders

KW - language

KW - outcome

KW - rehabilitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649288925&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649288925&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1545968310368962

DO - 10.1177/1545968310368962

M3 - Article

C2 - 20829410

AN - SCOPUS:78649288925

VL - 24

SP - 871

EP - 875

JO - Journal of Neurologic Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Neurologic Rehabilitation

SN - 1545-9683

IS - 9

ER -