Human Adipose Stromal Cells (ASC) for the Regeneration of Injured Cartilage Display Genetic Stability after In Vitro Culture Expansion

Simona Neri, Philippe Bourin, Julie Anne Peyrafitte, Luca Cattini, Andrea Facchini, Erminia Mariani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mesenchymal stromal cells are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration due to their multi-potency, immune-modulation and secretome activities, but safety remains one of the main concerns, particularly when in vitro manipulation, such as cell expansion, is performed before clinical application. Indeed, it is well documented that in vitro expansion reduces replicative potential and some multi-potency and promotes cell senescence. Furthermore, during in vitro aging there is a decrease in DNA synthesis and repair efficiency thus leading to DNA damage accumulation and possibly inducing genomic instability. The European Research Project ADIPOA aims at validating an innovative cell-based therapy where autologous adipose stromal cells (ASCs) are injected in the diseased articulation to activate regeneration of the cartilage. The primary objective of this paper was to assess the safety of cultured ASCs. The maintenance of genetic integrity was evaluated during in vitro culture by karyotype and microsatellite instability analysis. In addition, RT-PCR array-based evaluation of the expression of genes related to DNA damage signaling pathways was performed. Finally, the senescence and replicative potential of cultured cells was evaluated by telomere length and telomerase activity assessment, whereas anchorage-independent clone development was tested in vitro by soft agar growth. We found that cultured ASCs do not show genetic alterations and replicative senescence during the period of observation, nor anchorage-independent growth, supporting an argument for the safety of ASCs for clinical use.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere77895
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 28 2013

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genetic stability
stromal cells
Cartilage
Stromal Cells
cartilage
in vitro culture
Regeneration
Display devices
Cell Aging
DNA
Tissue regeneration
Safety
DNA damage
Telomerase
DNA Damage
Microsatellite Repeats
Agar
Repair
Genes
Aging of materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Human Adipose Stromal Cells (ASC) for the Regeneration of Injured Cartilage Display Genetic Stability after In Vitro Culture Expansion. / Neri, Simona; Bourin, Philippe; Peyrafitte, Julie Anne; Cattini, Luca; Facchini, Andrea; Mariani, Erminia.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 10, e77895, 28.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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