Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Clinical trials for Parkinson’s disease, which used primary brain fetal tissue, have demonstrated that neural stem cell therapy could be suitable for neurodegenerative diseases. The use of fetal tissue presents several issues that have hampered the clinical development of this approach. In addition to the ethical concerns related to the required continuous supply of fetal specimen, the necessity to use cells from multiple fetuses in a single graft greatly compounded the problem. Cell viability and composition vary in different donors, and, further, the heterogeneity in the donor cells increased the probability of immunological rejection or contamination. An ideal cell source for cell therapy is one that is renewable, thus eliminating the need for transplantation of primary fetal tissue, and that also allows for viability, sterility, cell composition, and cell maturation to be controlled, while being inherently not tumorigenic. The availability of continuous and standardized clinical grade normal human neural cells, able to combine the plasticity of fetal tissue with an extensive proliferating capacity and functional stability, would be of paramount importance for the translation of cell therapy for central nervous system (CNS) disorders into the clinic. Here we describe a well-established protocol to produce human neural stem cells following GMP guidelines that allows us to obtain “clinical grade” cell lines.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResults and Problems in Cell Differentiation
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages307-329
Number of pages23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameResults and Problems in Cell Differentiation
Volume66
ISSN (Print)0080-1844
ISSN (Electronic)1861-0412

Fingerprint

Fetal Stem Cells
Neural Stem Cells
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Fetus
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Cell Survival
Fetal Tissue Transplantation
Therapeutics
Central Nervous System Diseases
Infertility
Parkinson Disease
Clinical Trials
Guidelines
Transplants
Cell Line
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Ferrari, D., Gelati, M., Profico, D. C., & Vescovi, A. L. (2018). Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment. In Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation (pp. 307-329). (Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation; Vol. 66). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_14

Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment. / Ferrari, Daniela; Gelati, Maurizio; Profico, Daniela Celeste; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi.

Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation. Springer Verlag, 2018. p. 307-329 (Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation; Vol. 66).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ferrari, D, Gelati, M, Profico, DC & Vescovi, AL 2018, Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment. in Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation. Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation, vol. 66, Springer Verlag, pp. 307-329. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_14
Ferrari D, Gelati M, Profico DC, Vescovi AL. Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment. In Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation. Springer Verlag. 2018. p. 307-329. (Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93485-3_14
Ferrari, Daniela ; Gelati, Maurizio ; Profico, Daniela Celeste ; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi. / Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment. Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation. Springer Verlag, 2018. pp. 307-329 (Results and Problems in Cell Differentiation).
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