Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions

Anna Corcione, Federica Benvenuto, Elisa Ferretti, Debora Giunti, Valentina Cappiello, Francesco Cazzanti, Marco Risso, Francesca Gualandi, Giovanni Luigi Mancardi, Vito Pistoia, Antonio Uccelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) suppress T-cell and dendritic-cell function and represent a promising strategy for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. Nevertheless, no information is currently available on the effects of hMSCs on B cells, which may have a large impact on the clinical use of these cells. hMSCs isolated from the bone marrow and B cells purified from the peripheral blood of healthy donors were cocultured with different B-cell tropic stimuli. B-cell proliferation was inhibited by hMSCs through an arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and not through the induction of apoptosis. A major mechanism of B-cell suppression was hMSC production of soluble factors, as indicated by transwell experiments. hMSCs inhibited B-cell differentiation because IgM, IgG, and IgA production was significantly impaired. CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR7 B-cell expression, as well as chemotaxis to CXCL12, the CXCR4 ligand, and CXCL13, the CXCR5 ligand, were significantly down-regulated by hMSCs, suggesting that these cells affect chemotactic properties of B cells. B-cell costimulatory molecule expression and cytokine production were unaffected by hMSCs. These results further support the potential therapeutic use of hMSCs in immune-mediated disorders, including those in which B cells play a major role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-372
Number of pages6
JournalBlood
Volume107
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2006

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Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
B-Lymphocytes
Cells
Ligands
Tropics
Cell Cycle Resting Phase
T-cells
Immune System Diseases
Cell proliferation
G1 Phase
Therapeutic Uses
Chemotaxis
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Blood Donors
Bone Marrow Cells
Dendritic Cells
Immunoglobulin A
Autoimmune Diseases
Immunoglobulin M

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Corcione, A., Benvenuto, F., Ferretti, E., Giunti, D., Cappiello, V., Cazzanti, F., ... Uccelli, A. (2006). Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions. Blood, 107(1), 367-372. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2005-07-2657

Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions. / Corcione, Anna; Benvenuto, Federica; Ferretti, Elisa; Giunti, Debora; Cappiello, Valentina; Cazzanti, Francesco; Risso, Marco; Gualandi, Francesca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Pistoia, Vito; Uccelli, Antonio.

In: Blood, Vol. 107, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 367-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corcione, A, Benvenuto, F, Ferretti, E, Giunti, D, Cappiello, V, Cazzanti, F, Risso, M, Gualandi, F, Mancardi, GL, Pistoia, V & Uccelli, A 2006, 'Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions', Blood, vol. 107, no. 1, pp. 367-372. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2005-07-2657
Corcione A, Benvenuto F, Ferretti E, Giunti D, Cappiello V, Cazzanti F et al. Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions. Blood. 2006 Jan 1;107(1):367-372. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood-2005-07-2657
Corcione, Anna ; Benvenuto, Federica ; Ferretti, Elisa ; Giunti, Debora ; Cappiello, Valentina ; Cazzanti, Francesco ; Risso, Marco ; Gualandi, Francesca ; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi ; Pistoia, Vito ; Uccelli, Antonio. / Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate B-cell functions. In: Blood. 2006 ; Vol. 107, No. 1. pp. 367-372.
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