Human natural killer cells exposed to IL-2, IL-12, IL-18, or IL-4 differently modulate priming of naive T cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells

Sophie Agaugué, Emanuela Marcenaro, Bruna Ferranti, Lorenzo Moretta, Alessandro Moretta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in naive T-cell priming. Recent data suggested that natural killer (NK) cells can influence the capability of DCs to promote Th1 polarization. This regulatory function is primarily mediated by cytokines released in the microenvironment during inflammatory responses involving NK cells. In this study, we show that human NK cells exposed for short time to interleukin (IL)-12, IL-2, or IL-18, promote distinct pathways of Th1 priming. IL-12- or IL-2-conditioned NK cells induce maturation of DCs capable of priming IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. On the other hand, IL-18-conditioned NK cells induce Th1 polarization only when cocultured with both DCs and T cells. In this case, IL-2 released by T cells and IL-12 derived from DCs during the priming process promote interferon (IFN)-γ production. In contrast, when NK cells are exposed to IL-4, nonpolarized T cells releasing only low levels of IL-2 are generated. Thus, the prevalence of IL-12, IL-2, IL-18, or IL-4 at inflammatory sites may differentially modulate the NK-cell interaction with DCs, leading to different outcomes in naive T-cell polarization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1776-1783
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume112
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2008

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Interleukin-18
T-cells
Interleukin-12
Natural Killer Cells
Interleukin-4
Dendritic Cells
Interleukin-2
Monocytes
T-Lymphocytes
Polarization
Interferons
Th1 Cells
Cell Communication
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Human natural killer cells exposed to IL-2, IL-12, IL-18, or IL-4 differently modulate priming of naive T cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. / Agaugué, Sophie; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Ferranti, Bruna; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro.

In: Blood, Vol. 112, No. 5, 01.09.2008, p. 1776-1783.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agaugué, Sophie ; Marcenaro, Emanuela ; Ferranti, Bruna ; Moretta, Lorenzo ; Moretta, Alessandro. / Human natural killer cells exposed to IL-2, IL-12, IL-18, or IL-4 differently modulate priming of naive T cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. In: Blood. 2008 ; Vol. 112, No. 5. pp. 1776-1783.
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