Human peripheral blood lymphocytes targeted with bispecific antibodies release cytokines that are essential for inhibiting tumor growth

Jia Hua Qian, Julie A. Titus, Sarah M. Andrew, Delia Mezzanzanica, Maria A. Garrido, John R. Wunderlich, David M. Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have compared the mechanisms by which human PBL targeted with bispecific antibodies either lyse tumor cells or block their growth in culture or in mice. We found that resting PBL were unable to mediate lysis, but were able to block tumor growth. Moreover, targeted PBL were unable to lyse bystander cells, whereas targeted PBL did block the growth of bystander tumor cells in culture and in nude mice. Supernatants from cultures of targeted PBL or from PBL grown on anti-CD3-coated flasks, blocked the growth of tumor cells in the absence of added effector cells, and antibodies against TNF-α and IFN-γ reversed the inhibition of tumor growth, but had no effect upon cytolysis mediated by targeted by PBL. Our results show that targeted human PBL mediate two different antitumor activities: lysis, which occurs rapidly and requires the direct attachment of the target cell to the cytotoxic cell, and tumor growth inhibition, which is mediated by cytokines released into the medium as a result of receptor cross-linking. The inhibition of bystander tumor growth in mice by targeted PBL suggests that factor release is sufficient to block tumor growth in vivo. Targeted factor release therefore provides a mechanism by which targeted PBL could block the growth of tumor cells in vivo that were not bound by the effector cells, but which were located in the vicinity of tumor cells that were bound.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3250-3256
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume146
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - May 1 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human peripheral blood lymphocytes targeted with bispecific antibodies release cytokines that are essential for inhibiting tumor growth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Qian, J. H., Titus, J. A., Andrew, S. M., Mezzanzanica, D., Garrido, M. A., Wunderlich, J. R., & Segal, D. M. (1991). Human peripheral blood lymphocytes targeted with bispecific antibodies release cytokines that are essential for inhibiting tumor growth. Journal of Immunology, 146(9), 3250-3256.