Human skin-derived fibroblasts acquire in vitro anti-tumor potential after priming with paclitaxel

Augusto Pessina, Valentina Coccè, Arianna Bonomi, Loredana Cavicchini, Francesca Sisto, Maura Ferrari, Emilio Ciusani, Stefania Navone, Giovanni Marfia, Eugenio Parati, Giulio Alessandri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The main goal in cancer chemotherapy is to drive the drug into the tumor microenvironment to kill as many cancer cells as possible while producing the lowest collateral toxicity. Previously, we have shown that human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs) exposed to Paclitaxel (PTX) were able to uptake and subsequently release the drug in the culture medium. PTX primed hBM-MSCs (hBM-MSCsPTX) located in the vicinity of cancer cells produced a strong inhibition of tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. To expand these observations, in the present study we exposed human skin derived fibroblasts (hSDFs) to 2,000 ng/ml of PTX and then tested both cells and their conditioned medium (CM) in vitro for their capacity to inhibit the proliferation of human tumor cell lines (MOLT-4, DU-145, U87-MG, SH-SY5Y(+) and LAN-5). We found that hSDFs primed with PTX (hSDFsPTX) were able to uptake and subsequently release PTX in a time dependent manner. hSDFsPTX-derived CM(hSDFsPTX-CM) from 1:4 to 1:10 dilutions produced a significant (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)523-530
Number of pages8
JournalAnti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Drug uptake
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Skin dermal fibroblasts
  • Stromal cells
  • Taxol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

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